Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 37

Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historical Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol. VIII No.37                                                   April 1969

“It is April, and Hillsborough beckons!”

Fourth Biennial Spring Tour of the Hillsborough Historical Society

April 26 and 27, 1969

Time: Saturday, April 26, 1969 – 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M

Sunday, April 27, 2969 – 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M

Headquarters: The Old Courthouse on Court Square

Tickets: Adults $2.50

Children (Through High School) $1.00

The Planning Committee:

General Chairman: Mrs. H.W. Moore

Mrs. Erle Hill

Administrative Assistant to the General Chairman:

Mrs. Don Cox

Registration:           Mrs. E.M. Lockhart

Mrs. Elmer Dowdy

Hostesses:              Mrs. John Graham Webb

Floral Arrangements: Mrs. George Gilmore

Hillsborough Light Rifles: Bill Jarrell

Window Displays: Quentin Patterson

Posters: Mrs. Kay Winecoff

Guides: Dr. H.W. Moore & Mrs. Alice McBone

Tickets: E. Wilson Cole

Publicity: Mrs. William Hopewell

Mrs. D.C. Rhew

Mrs. George Gilmore

Bank Concert: John Black

Crafts: Mrs. Van Kenyon

Mrs. Hume Claytor

Mrs. Henry Walker

Parking: Remus Smith, Jr.

Food Concessions: Mrs. Quentin Patterson

Museum: Mrs. Clarence D. Jones

At the Executive Board Meeting on March 3, 1969 the following places and features were announced to be open for the 1969 Pilgrimage.

Greenhill

San Souci

Commandants House

Moore’s Pleasure

Burwell School

Heartsease Garden

Nash Law Office

Hillsborough Crafts

Hillsborough Light Rifles

Museum

Masonic Lodge

Regulators Grave

St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church

Presbyterian Church

Methodist Church

Baptist Church

GUIDES AND TOUR PLANS

Dr. H.W. Moore, as “dispatcher”, will provide each “Pilgrim” with a helpful, mimeographed town ma and tour plan and start him on his tour. Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and students from various schools will serve as guides at intersections, parking areas, etc. Some of the warmest praise heard at the 1967 Pilgrimage was for the courtesy and tireless good humor of Hillsborough’s boys and girls who met the public with poise and competence.

RED CROSS FIRST AID

A Red Cross First Aid Station will be set up at the Old Courthouse and medical aid will be available throughout the Pilgrimage.

OUR TOUR HOSTESSES

General Chairman: Mrs. John G. Webb

Greenhill Mrs. James Coman, Jr.

San Souci: Mrs. A.H. Walker, Sr.

Nash Law Office: Miss Elizabeth Collins

Moore’s Pleasure: Mrs. Hume Claytor

Heartsease Garden: Mrs. Sam Gattis

Commandant’s House: Mrs. Dalton Loftin

Burwell School: Mrs. Fred Cates

Episcopal Church: Miss Annie Cameron

Presbyterian Church: Mrs. Ed. Barnes

Methodist Church: Mrs. J.E. Latta

Baptist Church: Mrs. George Simmons

Masonic Lodge: Mr. G.A. Brown

Hillsborough hostesses are famed for their gracious charm and hospitality – and they are knowledgeable too! Each group of hostesses has met with the home owner and studied the history and furnishings of the house. Thus, when a “Pilgrim” asks about an old plate warmer or a soup tureen or “that portrait – right there – over the desk”, the hostesses has the correct information on the tip of her tongue.”

COSTUMED HOSTESSES will be scattered about here and there, according to Mrs. H.W. Moore, the General Chairman of the Pilgrimage. “We haven’t requested each and every hostess to be in costume”, she says, “but we think enough will be to add a touch of colonial atmosphere.”

HOMES AND GARDENS TO BE VISITED

  1. THE NASH LAW OFFICE: 143 West Margaret Lane

This property was purchased in July 1966 by Judge L.J Phipps for possible purchase and restoration by the Hillsborough Historical Commission. This is one of the two best surviving examples of Old Hillsborough Law Offices. (The other: Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin’s Law Office at Burnside.) The date of its construction is uncertain but the 1770’s has been given as a possible time. Tradition says a royal governor used it temporarily. According to old deeds, Lot #10 was sold by Duncan Cameron in 1805 to Chief Justice Frederick Nash with the building there on. An earlier owner, Frances Nash, may have built the Law Office as the Nash home stood where the Farmers Exchange stands today.

After Chief Justice Frederick Nash died in 1857, his daughters, Misses Sally K. and Maria Nash with their cousin Sarah Kollock, began the famous Nash and Kollock School for Young Ladies. During this time the Law Office was used as a music studio. Two rooms to the west were added as Sarah Kollock’s living quarters and were also used as piano practice rooms.

The Law Office is a delightful room. Mr. Don Shepherd, the present occupant, has made a charming place with his use of traditional colors and furniture in shades of wine and red to enhance the rich green of the paneling, reeded mantel, and cupboards.

“Cousin Sarah’s” rooms are interesting too, with Mr. Shepherd’s deft artistry creating a place of charm. Those who have read “Ladies in the Making” will recognize the Dutch door over which the calf “Buttercup” thrust her head to listen to the young ladies’ music.

Mrs. T. E. Lloyd, the former owner, created a lovely old fashioned garden with flagged walks and gay borders of old fashioned garden flowers. Mr. Shepherd has planted hundreds of tulips and flowering bulbs to make this a spring garden worth seeing aside from its historical value.

2. THE COMMANDANT’S HOUSE OF THE HILLSBOROUGH MILITARY ACADEMY:

Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Cheshire and Mrs. Cheshire’s Mother, Mrs. Carl Davis, have recently restored this interesting house which was built by Col. Charles Courtney Tew in 1859. The square two story brick structure resembles a medieval castle or fort with its’ crenellated roof and towers or buttresses at each corner. Used as a Military School until the Civil War, at which time all the student cadets entered the army and the school was closed and never reopened.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Cheshire and Mrs. Davis are of early Orange County ancestry. Mr. Cheshire is a direct descendant of James Hogg who came to Hillsborough during the 1700’s. Consequently, this house has many beautiful pieces of old furniture of the colonial period.

A life size portrait of Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, painted by Clem Strudwick, hangs over the living room mantel. This portrait was later copied for St. Mary’s school in Raleigh. The entire house will be open.

This is the first time the house has been opened and visitors will be delighted with this addition to the pilgrimage.

  1. MOORE’S PLEASURE:

Completely restored by Dr. and Mrs. H.W. Moore, this house was built in the late 1700’s by a wealthy Wilmington woman who came to Hillsborough to escape the mosquitoes, fevers and miasma of the Costal region.

This house is sometimes called a “Morris” house because it seems indebted to the famous plate 37 of Robert Morris’ “Rural Architecture” (London 1750), as is the Semple House in Williamsburg.

The house had three pedimented units: a three story central black with lower flanking wings. The mantels are handsome with reeding, the paneling and alcove treatments are unique and the entire house shows the influence of the colonial lady who built it and of the present lady who now lives in it.

Beautifully and tastefully furnished in keeping with the period to which it belongs, this house always excites visitors with its charm.

A gem of a house, beautifully restored and cherished. The grounds are landscaped with native trees and boxwood.

  1. SAN SOUCI:

An extremely handsome plantation house built before 1800. Mr. S. T. Latta, Jr. will open this house for the first time in over 30 years. The central block is conceded to be of an earlier date with the wings added at a later time. The beautifully proportioned rooms are of enormous dimensions. John Berry enlarged San Souci in the middle nineteenth century and added the rear staircase and some wooden detail.

Furnished with antique furniture, especially a fine old piano and a day bed said to be original with the house. An especially handsome silver tea server of English origin is a very valuable feature of the dining room with its huge table, hunt board and china press and a dutch cupboard laden with old china, glass and sliver.

Plantation office and the outside kitchen will also be shown.

  1. THE GARDEN AT HEARTEASE:

A quaint boxwood garden with borders of spring flowers and bulbs, centered with an interesting wellhouse. The home of Miss Rebecca Hall, the house, which will not be open, is said to have been built before 1810. Governor Thomas Burke was said to have owned the house and deeds show that his daughter, Mary H. (Polly) Burke, bought it in 1810 and owned in until 1837. She planted the Mary Burke rose which still grows and blooms in the garden.

When the Connecticut newspaper editor, Dennis Heartt, acquired the house, he named it Heartsease. The ascetic-looking, well-educated Heartt loved words, and the play upon spelling and meaning in the word probably pleased him enormously. In the early days Miss Caroline Heartt had a greenhouse behind the Heartsease where she and her friends wintered their “exotics” but this is gone now, as is the building where Miss Alice Heartt has a school for the children of Hillsborough families. Foundations of this building are incorporated in the garden.

  1. THE BURWELL SCHOOL:

Purchased in 1966 by the Historic Hillsborough Commission and in the process of being completely restored, this house was for 20 years (1837-1857) the Burwell “Female School”. The Rev. Robert Burwell and his wife, Margaret Anna Robertson Burwell, conducted the school and instilled in their students the staunch Presbyterian principles that made it so popular with the pre-Civil War parents of young ladies. This was a “boarding” school and the students came from the eastern Seaboard as far south as Florida. Later owned by the C.M. Parks and J.S. Spurgeon families. Schoolroom building, office and summer house are gone. The south section of this spacious house was built ca 1821, north wing by John Berry in 1848 and was remodeled in 1890. The house in now being restored to its “Burwell School” period.

The gardens have very fine trees; sugar maples, lindens and sycamores. Spring bulbs, daffodils, narcissi and lily-of-the-valley beds with flowering shrubs create a charming setting for the stately house.

There is some furniture in the house, gifts and acquisitions in keeping with the Burwell School period.

  1. GREENHILL:

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Coman, Jr. brought Greenhill from its original setting and restored this house built about 1750 to its former glory.

The house is interesting in its entirety. The windows are all original panes, with the wavy look of poured glass. The hand carved paneling which was made in Orange County is very handsome. The cornice, mantels, baseboards and window trims are all original. The three large outside doors to the home are Christian doors, with a gross at the top and an open Bible in the bottom panel. Walls, floors and ceiling are all random-width pine. The original three rooms were built about 1750 on a land grant from the King of England to Charles Wilson Johnston, and was owned by the Johnston family until the Comans bought it. They moved it 12 miles from its former site to the lovely green hill on which it now rests.

Furnished with furniture of ;the 1730 period except in the “keeping room” or den. The Comans did extensive research with the help of Personnel of the North Carolina Department of Archives in the restoration and furnishing of “Greenhill”. One wall in the “borning room” was originally part of the back porch. This is a tyr of construction seen only twice in Williamsburg where it is dated 1680 and never seen before in the Piedmont. Mr. and Mrs. Coman used it as a well in the small room, which Mr. Coman now uses as a study, in order to preserve it. 53 members of the Johnson family were born in this room.

  1. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH:

(1816) Near NW corner of Churton and W. Tryon Sts. Now 150 years old, this small simple church was built in 1816 in public Lot 98 (the town burial ground) by permission of town authorities. Designer and builder unknown (may have been Samuel Hancock assisted by John Berry). An 1835 water color owned by the late Mr. Shepperd Strudwick shows the church to have been originally a plain brick structure with hip roof and double-hung sash windows. In 1892 the Church was extensively remodeled and the present picturesque tower and spire were added. Interesting lists of early pew rents and other framed documents hang in the Church vestibule. The organizer and first pastor, the Rev. John Knox Witherspoon (1791-1853), grandson of John Witherspoon, and New Jersey Signer of the Declaration of Independence, is buried in the Nash family plot close to the west wall of the Cemetery.

  1. ST. MATHEW’s EPISCOPAL CHURCH:

(1824) and Churchyard – At eastern boundary of town; near end of E. King St. The historic first St. Matthew’s Church on Lot 98, a Church of England Edifice, was built before 1768 and burned about 1793. The present St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church was organized and built in 1824 on land given by Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin (1787-1870). Possibly designed by Vestryman Francis Lister Hawks in collaboration with John Berry. A diminutive Gothic Revival structure effectively situated on a high wooded knoll. It has been frequently and extensively remodeled: 1830 tower added; 1835, gallery installed; 1850, tower rebuilt; 1868, recessed chancel with triplet window and exposed beam roof installed; 1868 or 1875, original wainscoting replaced; spire added. High pointed windows (two of which contain early Tiffany glass) and the extremely slender spire add to the charm of the Church. One frequently noted window shows the Savior wearing a flat-crowned, wide-brimmed had encircled by a crown of thorns. The Rt. Rev. William Mercer Green, first Rector, later first Bishop of Mississippi, is buried very nearly beneath the altar. The Rev. Moses Ashley Curtis (1808-1872), eminent botanist and musician, is buried behind the Church. (State marker on Churton St.) A new 2-acre memorial garden on E. King St. will honor the Reverent Curtis.

MATTHEW’S CHURCHYARD:

In this lovely solemn spot, deeply shadowed by massive trees and secluded by brick walls, lie Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin and many members of the Ruffin family as well as of the Cain, Cameron, Kirkland, Graham, Collins, Webb, Strudwick, Jones, and Hill families. A plat of the Churchyard hands in the vestibule of the Church.

METHODIST CHURCH

(ca. 1859) W/ Tryon St. near intersection with Wake St. The only Hillsborough church known certainly to have been both designed and built by John Berry. Its high elevation, tall windows, tower and steeple make this a particularly graceful, attractive church. Berry’s use of white trim against red brick gives it a Georgian quality that definitely relates it to the Old Courthouse. Louvered shutters, a gallery, the original pews, and an unusual antique pulpit with fluted columns (now somewhat reduced in height) give interest to the interior. The first Methodist Church was a frame structure on E. Tryon St.

  1. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH:

(1860-1870) Corner of Wake and W. King Sts. This is the second site of the First Baptist Church. Its home until about 1862 was the old courthouse building, now the A.M.E. Church on the southwest corner of Churton and E. Queen Sts. The present brick building, designed by W.M. Percival of Raleigh and built by D. Kistler, was begun in 1860 but completed only in 1870 because of the Civil War. Capt. John Berry completed the brickwork. The Church is Romanesque in design with a free-standing tower to one side. Doors leading to the gallery, possibly meant for slaves, can still be seen on the north of the tower. The rounded Romanesque arch is repeated over the interior windows and the door leading to the baptistery as well as in the exposed, hand-carved beams of the high, open ceiling. The original wooden steeple decayed about 1924 and was removed. Floodlighted at night.

  1. OLD ORANGE COUNTY COURTHOUSE:

(1844) SE corner of E. King and Churton Sts. on Lot 1. Designed and built, 1844-45, by Captain John Berry, native brickmason, architect, legislator, (See bronze plaque at entrance.) A singularly handsome Greek Revival building recently cited as an Historic American Building. Built of red brick with white trim. Impressive Doric Portico. Details of woodwork and stair brackets come from Asher Benjamin’s Pattern books on which Berry drew heavily. Double staircase probably occupied the space opposite the entrance door thus making the original entrance hall two stories high. Building floodlighted at night.

ORANGE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM:

(est. 1957) Housed on the second floor in the former courtroom of the Old Courthouse. Courtroom altered in the 1880’s; originally contained a gallery. The Museum concentrates on exhibits illustrating the first hundred years of Orange County history: a Homespun Room with a 150-year old loom, an 18th-century kitchen, Indian exhibits, antique costumes, examples of the work of early Hillsborough silversmiths, and an especially fine and valuable set of brass and copper standard Weights and Measures, made in England, purchased by Orange County in 1760. Edwin M. Lynch is Keeper of the Weights and Measures. Murals illustrating the early history of the area will decorate one wall of the Museum.

THE OLD TOWN CLOCK (IN THE CUPOLA)

One of the most famous clocks in North Carolina. History uncertain. Made in Birmingham, England, and said to have been a royal gift to the town about 1769. Tradition says it hung in the first St. Matthew’s Church of England, then in the tower of the Market-House. Since late 1846 it has hung in the octagonal cupola of the Old Courthouse. Allen A. Lloyd is keeper of the Clock.

  1. MASONIC HALL:

142 W. King St. A simple, square Greek Revival building of red brick with white portico of four Ionic columns. Designed by Captain William Nichols, state architect. Home of Eagle Lodge, No.19, A.F. & A.M., chartered in 1791. The building, almost a perfect cube, 40 feet in length, breadth, and height, three bays to a side, was originally surmounted by a gallery with windows and an observatory with telescope. Called “the King Street Opera House” for years, the building long functioned virtually as a town auditorium. Now floodlighted at night. Masonic Halls stands on Lot 23, on or very near the spot where Col. Edmond Fanning’s House stood before the Regulators cut it from its sills, Sept 25, 1770.

THE HILLSBOROUGH LIGHT RIFLES will set up a colonial military encampment on the site of;the prospective Moses Ashley Curtis Garden. The camp will be complete with men and officers, tents, corrals for the mounts, Ladies Pavilion, guns and cannon. A military museum will be of great interest. All weapons on display will be of the Colonial Period and of the vintage of the first organization of the Hillsborough Light Rifles Regiment 200 years ago.

HILLSBOROUGH CRAFTS:

A group interested in promoting quality crafts in Orange County is making plans for Hillsborough Crafts Fair to be held during the tour, April 26 & 27. This has the approval of the tour committee and the group is sponsored by numerous organizations throughout the county. The group will arrange workshops of a variety of crafts to be determined by interests and needs within the county. Presently workshops in decoupage are being conducted. Selected handcrafted articles will be offered for sale in the Colonial Inn Gift Shop, Which will open in the near future.

At the Fair (to be hold in a downtown building) items will be for0 sale in: The Garden Store; The Needle Arts Nook, showing quilts, afghans, crewel embroidery, needlepoint, etc.; The Bakery, featuring colonial cookies, candies and recipes; The Hobby Shop carrying items of mental, wood, pottery, etc.; and the very special corner for Pot purri.

Also: Authentic replicas and original colonial craft items will be displayed.

TOTAL MEMBERSHIP 517

Lt. & Mrs. Gregory G. Brown, Fayetteville

Mr. Luther R. Fruit, Borger, Texas

Mr. B. S. Tillinghast, Dillon, S.C.

Mr. Hugh Burch,                     Hillsborough, N.C.

Mr. Lucius M. Cheshire, Jr.                   “

Mr. & Mrs. James Rae Freeland           “

Mr. & Mrs. C. A. Hutchins                     “

Mr. Jack Jurney, NCNB                         “

Mr. S. T. Latta                                      “

Mr. Carl Ramsey                                  “

Mr. & Mrs. E. Clifton Robinson             “

Mr. Robert J. Weirich                            “

Mr. & Mrs. A. Leon Waters                   “

Mrs. R. L. Satterfield                            “

Mrs. C. T. Davis                                    “

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Clements              “

Mr. John R. Black                                   “

Miss Amy Rhew, Jr. Member                  “

Mr. & Mrs. D. A. Murphy, Chapel Hill, N. C.

Necrology

Mr. Spotswood Boyd, Raleigh N. C.

Mrs. Bayard Carter, Durham, N. C.

Mrs. Lawrence Flinn, Long Island, New York

Mr. Joseph P. Hughes, Hillsborough, N. C.

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 36

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol. VII, No. 36                     October, 1968

CALL TO THE 1968 ANNUAL MEETING

—————

Friday evening

October 11, 1968                                                                                                        8:00 P. M.

The Courthouse

Hillsborough, N. C.

All members and friends of the Hillsborough Historical Society are invited to attend the seventh Annual Meeting of the Society on Friday evening, October 11, 1968, at 8:00 P.M. in the Orange County Courthouse.

Our guest speaker will be:

  1. RAY WILKINSON, Chairman

Historical Halifax Restoration Association.

—————

After a business session, the Society will elect its officers for the 1968-1969 year. The Nominating Committee, (Mr John M. Roberts, Chm., Mrs. John W Carr, and Mr. Quentin W Patterson) submits to the Society the following slate of officers for 1968-1969.

President                                 –           Mr. Dalton H. Loftin

Vice- President                       –           Mr. Don S Matheson

Secretary                                 –           Mrs. William Hopewell

Treasurer                                 –           Mr. Marion M Clark

Board Member:

–           Mr. Lucius M. Cheshire – 5 year term

replacing Dr. Charles H Blake whose term has

expired.

  • Miss Elizabeth H. Collins (4 year term)
  • John Graham Webb (3 year term)
  • James H. Coman (2 year term)
  • Marion B Roberts ( 1 year term)

These four members are serving continuing terms are not subject to re-election.

NOTE:                        Any individual member of the Society may make a nomination for any office by (1) securing the consent of the nominee, and (2) transmitting his nomination in writing to the Secretary at least five days before the Annual Meeting, Such a written nomination must contain a statement to the effect that the nominee or nominees have consented to their names being placed in nomination and that they will serve in their respective offices.

MEMBERSHIP ROLL, 1968

The Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.

(Year ending December 31, 1968)

Honorary Member

Nash, Mrs. Frank, Box 482, Hillsborough 2728

Life Members

Blake, Dr. and Mrs. Charles H., Chatwood, Hillsborough 27278

Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce, Box 395, Durham 27702

Cotten, Mrs. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill 27514

Draper-Savage, Mr. Edward T., Moorefields, Hillsborough 27278

Engstrom, Dr. and Mrs. Alfred G., Nash-Hooper House, 118 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Holeman, Miss Jean, 109 Forest Wood Drive, Durham 27707

Kenan, Mr. Frank H., Box 2537, W. Durham Station, Durham 27704

McKenna, Mrs. Richard M., 11 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, 27514

Murray, Mrs. William T., 404 W. Hill Ave., Hillsborough 27278

Murphy, Dr. and Mrs. Robert J., Seven Hearths, Hillsborough 27278

Riley, Mr. Dalton Roberts, Jr., P.O. Box 145, Efland 27243

Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. John Mason, W. Tryon St. Hillsborough 27278

Stoney, Mrs. A.B., 509 W. Union St., Morganton 28655

Contributing Members

Auman, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn, Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Bason, Mrs. Gorge F., 737 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 27514

Berry, Mr. and Mrs. John, 2122 N. Lakeshore Dr., Chapel Hill 27514

Borland, Judge and Mrs. A.H., 1600 High St., Durham 27707

Brower, Mrs. Alfred S., 2543 Sevier St., Durham 27707

Browning, Mr. H. Conway, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Cobb, Mr. and Mrs. Collier Jr., 603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 27514

Cotten, Dr. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill 27514

Crawford, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M., Colonial Inn, Hillsborough 27278

Cuyler, Mr. and Mrs. W. Kenneth, Rt. 7, Box 15, Durham 27707

Daniel, Dr. and Mrs. George B. Jr., 2 Gooseneck Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Dillingham, Mr. and Mrs. George M., 1401 Caswell Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Dwelle, Mrs. Harold C., 314 Hempstead Place, Charlotte 28209

Gay, Mr. and Mrs. James E. Jr., 754 N. Stratford Rd., Winston-Salem 27104

Graves, Mrs. Louise, 1118 Battle Lane, Chapel Hill 27514

Hopewell, Mr. and Mrs. William, Rt. 2, Hillsborough 27278

Kellenberger, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 806 Parkway, Greensboro 27408

Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. S.S., Ayr Mount, Hillsborough 27278

Labouisse, Mr. and Mrs. John W., Fairntosh, Box 8005, Durham 27704

Lindsay, Mrs. Hal, 1803 Ridgewood Dr., Atlanta, Ga. 30307

Matheson, Mr. and Mrs. Don S., E. Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Orgain, Mrs. Edward S., 3321 Devon Rd., Durham 27707

Patton, Mr. and Mrs. James R., 111 W. Forest Hills Blvd. Durham 27707

Scott, Mrs. Don E. Sr., 619 Main St. Graham 27253

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Roland C., Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Young M. Jr., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Turner, Maj. Frances B., B-3, 105 Riverside Park, Hopewell, Va. 23860

Von, Lennep, Mme. Eric N., Didam, Bridgwater, Conn. 06752

Wager, Dr. Paul W., 206 University Dr., Chapel Hill 27514

Walser, Prof. Richard, Box 5308, Raleigh 27607

Warren, Mrs. J.A., 301 Hillsborough St., Chapel Hill 27514

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. James, 511 Cornwallis Dr., Greensboro 27408

Webb, Mrs. J.C., E. Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Annual Members

Altvater, Mr. and Mrs. F.V., 771 York St., Denver, Colorado 80206

Anderson, Dr. and Mrs. Carl L., Cabe Ford Farm, Rt. 2, Durham

Andrews, Dr. Nita, Bolin Brook Farm, Rt. 1, Chapel Hill 27514

Andrews, Dr. and Mrs. T.M., Bolin Brook Farm, Rt. 1, Chapel Hill 27514

Arrasmith, Mrs. William Strudwick, 329 N. Bonner Ave., Louisville Ky. 40207

Auman, Miss Catherine, Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Bain, Mr. and Mrs. R. Allan, 607 W. Front St., Burlington 27215

Ballard, Mr. and Mrs. John, Box 927, Hillsborough 27278

Barbour, Mrs. Nancy C., Appinwood Farm, Hillsborough 27278

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. E.P., St. Mary’s Rd, Hillsborough 27278

Beard, Mr. and Mrs. L.E., 134 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Beeler, Dr. and Mrs. James Rush, 608 Jamestown Rd., Williamsburg, Va. 23185

Berry, Mrs. Mary Strudwick, 304 Wentworth Dr., Greensboro 27408

Bivens, Mr. Thomas E., Hillsborough 27278

Bivens, Mr. and Mrs. O.E., Hillsborough 27278

Blackley, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J., Happy Valley Farm, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Blackwood, Miss Mattie E., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill 27514

Blaine, Prol. J.C.D., Greenwood Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Blalock, Mr. and Mrs. Julian H., 100 Cherokee Rd. Hampton, Va. 23361

Bond, Prof. and Mrs. Richmond P., 101 Pine Lane, Chapel Hill 27514

Booker, Mr. Curtis, Rt. 2, Chapel Hill 27514

Booker, Mr. and Mrs. John G., Rt. 2, Chapel Hill 27514

Boone, Dr. and Mrs. W. Waldo, 3921 Nottaway Rd., Durham 27707

Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. Spotswood, 3018 Randolph Dr., Raleigh 27609

Brinton, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh P., 12 Davie Circle, Chapel Hill 27514

Brody, Dr. and Mrs. Irvin A., Hwy 70, Hillsborough 27278

Brown, Miss Estelle, Methodist Home, Irwin Rd., Durham 27705

Brown, Mr. Grady A., Occoneechee Farm, Hillsborough 27278

Brown, Mrs. H.H., 4925 Camino Real, Tucson, Arizona 85718

Brown, Miss Joyce, 4925 Camino Real, Tucson, Arizona 85718

Brown, Mr. Henry N. III, 3697 Northwood Dr., Memphis, Tenn. 38111

Browning, Miss Kate, Rt. 2, Durham 27705

Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. Victor S. Sr., 1012 Vickers Ave., Durham 27707

Burke, Miss Evelyn F., 6300 Richmond Place, Norfolk, Va. 23505

Caldwell, Mrs. A. Leroy, 809 Hermitage Court Dr., Durham 27707

Cameron, Miss Annie S., Box 644, Hillsborough 27278

Cammack, Mr. Allen B., 123 East Davis St., Burlington 27215

Carr, Mr. and Mrs. G. Paul, 217 W Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Carr, Mr. and Mrs. John W., 141 E King St., Hillsborough 27278

Carroll, Mrs. Adrian, 627 Fountain Place, Burlington, 27215

Carroll, Dr. and Mrs. L. W. , Box 475, Hillsborough 27278

Carter, Dr. and Mrs. Baynard, 5 Sylvan Rd., Durham, 27701

Carter, Miss Grace, 301 Miller St., Winston-Salem 27103

Carter, Miss Mary L, 301 Miller St., Winston-Salem 27103

Carter, Miss Ruth, 301 Miller St., Winston-Salem 27103

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. Jr., 112 W Union St., Hillsborough 27278

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Jr., Box 167, Hillsborough 27278

Caviness, Dr. and Mrs. Verne S., 109 N Boylan Ave., Raleigh 27609

Cheshire, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius M. Box 175, Hillsborough 27278

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Marion M. Hillsborough 27278

Clayton, Mrs. Louise R. 121 E Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Clayton, Mr. and Mrs. Fred T.,W. Margaret Land, Hillsborough 27278

Cleland, Dr. and Mrs. James T., 2117 Myrtle Dr., Durham 27707

Cobb, Mrs. Collier and Miss Mary L. 517 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 27514

Coker Mr. C.F.W., Box 1563, Raleigh, 27609

Cole, Mrs. C.C. 115 N Occoneechee, Hillsborough 27278

Cole, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Cole, Mr. and Mrs. E. Wilson, St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Collins, Miss Elizabeth H. Highlands, Hillsborough 27278

Collins, Colonel H. W., 809 Elizabeth St. Ft. Collins, Colorado 80521

Coman, Mr. and Mrs. James H., Greenhill, Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Coman, Mr. James H. III, Greenhill, Rt.3, Hillsborough 27278

Copeland, Mrs. Billie, 412 W.King St., Hillsborough 27278

Copeland, Mr. and Mrs. Eric H., 1007 Norwood Ave., Durham 27707

Couch, Mr. and Mrs. John, Gulf Oil Co., Hillsborough 27278

Cox, Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Queen St. Hillsborough 27278

Craig, Miss Jean, 706 Piedmont St., Reidsville, 27220

Craig, Mr. Luther M., 104 Hilton Ave., Durham 27707

Craig, Mr. P.H. Jr., Box 877, Chapel Hill 27514

Currie, Mr. and Mrs. John M., Carthage, 28327

Coley, Mrs. Gladys L., Box 381, Hillsborough 27278

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Archie R., 52 Beverly Dr., Durham

Davis, Mrs. Carl E., Box 175, Hillsborough 27278

Dickson, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Dority, Mrs. C. F., 412 W king St., Hillsborough 27278

Dowdy, Mr. and Mrs. E. R., 408 N Churton St., Hillsborough 27278

Dubose, Mr. and Mrs. D. St. Pierre, Box 310, Durham 27702

Duckett, Mrs. E. DuVal, 2419 King St., Alexandria Va. 22301

Dudley, Dr. Harold J., Box 10785, Raleigh 27605

Edmister, Mrs. Floyd, Univ. Lake Dr. Rt. 1, Chapel Hill 27514

Efland, Mrs. Lindsay, Box 97, Efland 27243

Eskridge, Mrs. J. D., St Mary’s Road, Hillsborough 27278

Eskridge, Mr. Joe, St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough 27278

Felts, Mrs. Frances Carter, 217 B. New Dr., Apt D, Winston-Salem 27103

French, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R., 2400 Belvedere Dr., Baytown, Texas 77520

Fouchee, Mr. Robert B., Box 1145 Chapel Hill 27514

Flinn, Mrs. Lawrence, Lily Pond Ln, East Hampton, Long Island, N.Y. 11937

Flower, Mr. and Mrs. Walter C., 12 Claremont Ave., Maplewood, N.J. 27040

Forrest, Mr. and Mrs. B.B., 114 N Wake St., Hillsborough 27278

Forrest, Mrs. Louise, Hillsborough, 27278

Forrest, Miss Mary B., 176 W King St., Hillsborough 27278

Forrest, Mrs. Robert O., W Cobb Dorm., UNC Chapel Hill, 27514

Fowler, Mr. and Mrs. M.M., 2023 Club Blvd., Durham 27704

Franck, Mrs. Martha L., 801 Onslow St. Durham 27705

Frick, Mrs. Arthur C., 2621 N Summit Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 53211

Fudge, Rev. and Mrs. Sam, Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Gardiner, Mr. and Mrs. Leo, Box 575, Chapel Hill 27514

Gattis, Miss Jean, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem, 27101

Gattis, Mrs. Virginia, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem, 27101

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs. B.P., Jr., Box 195, Hillsborough 27278

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs. B.P., Sr., 209 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Graham, Mr. and Mrs. A.H., Montrose, Hillsborough 27278

Graham, Dr. and Mrs. William A., 2247 Cranford Rd. Durham 27706

Gulick, Mr. and Mrs. H.E. 213 N Churton St., Hillsborough 27278

Gilmore, Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Box 86, Hillsborough 27278

Gilmore, Miss Jill, Cape Fear Hospital, Fayetteville

Hall, Dr. and Mrs. C.B., 1835 Eye St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006

Hamlin, Mr. and Mrs. E.J., 315 W King St., Hillsborough 27278

Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. B.S. 2687 Shelton Dr., Decatur, Ga. 30033

Hayes, Miss Sue B., E Union St., Hillsborough 27278

Hicks, Mr. and Mrs. Frank D., Ridgewood Lane, Chapel Hill 27514

Hill, Mrs. Erle G., 173 W Margaret Lane, Hillsborough 27278

Hogg, Miss Irma, 3711 San Felipe, Apt 9-B, Houston, Texas 77027

Holden, Mr. John A., Box 373, LaPlace, Louisiana 70068

Hollandsworth, Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Maple Hill Farm, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Holliday, Mr. and Mrs. Donald V., 613 Glenview Rd. Enfield 27823

Hopkins, Mrs. Florence B., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill 27514

Howard, Mr. and Mrs. Harry, Orange High, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Hubbard, Rev. and Mrs. C.S., 1203 Branch St., Wilson 27893

Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. J.P., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Hughes, Mr. J.P. Jr., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Hughes, Mr. R. M., Woodbriar Rd., Winston-Salem 27106

Hughes, Miss Elizabeth, 233 Andrews Ave., Henderson 27536

Hughes, Mrs. Robert D., Cedar Grove 27231

Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M., 704 Pine tree Dr., New Bern 28560

Hunt, Miss Helen L. Box 469, Chapel Hill 27514

Isenhour, Mr. and Mrs. Vance, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Isley, Mr. and Mrs. R.W., Cedar Grove 27231

Ives, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest, Paint Hill Farm, Southern Pines 28387

James, Mrs. C.J. and Miss Charlotte Rhew, W Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Jarrell, Mr. and Mrs. William, Major Business Forms, Inc. 206 S Churton St. Hillsborough 27278

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence D., Eno Lodge, Hillsborough 27278

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. 133 Hale St. Beverly Mass. 01915

Jones, Mrs. Kenneth R. II, Box 116, Vanceborro 28586

Kenyon, Mr. and Mrs. Van L., Rt. 2, Hillsborough 27278

Knight, Mr. and Mrs. C.D., Box 201, Hillsborough 27278

Latta, Mr. and Mrs. Harold F., Hwy 57 N, Hillsborough 27278

Laws, Mr. and Mrs. J.E., 309 N Churton St., Hillsborough 27278

LeGrand, Mrs. John Q. 504 Monroe St., Chapel Hill, 27514

Leonard, Mr. and Mrs. Tommy, Orange High School Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Lester, Mrs. Robert M., 606 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill 27514

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. H.H. 1402 Virginia Ave., Durham 27705

Lineburger, Mrs. Adrian S. 2 Cobb terrace, Chapel Hill 27514

Link, Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Rt. @, Durham 27705

Little, Mrs. William B., 608 Wanaka Circle, Wadesboro 28107

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Jr. Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Sr. Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Lloyd, Miss Nellie G., 707 Shepherd St., Durham 27705

Lockhart, Mrs. Christine C. Presbyterian Church, Chapel Hill 27514

Lockhart, Mrs. E.M. 109 N Wake St., Hillsborough 27278

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. E.M. Jr., 516 Platt Terrace, Aiken, SC

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. John K., 309 Wrenn Ave., Mt Airy 27030

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. 186 E Wesley Rd., N.E., Atlanta GA. 30305

Loflin, Mr. and Mrs. Dalton H., 412 N. Cameron St., Hillsborough 27278

Lynch, Mr. Edwin M., 312 N Churton St., Hillsborough 27278

Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. William F., Box 212, Hillsborough 27278

MacLamroc, Mr. and Mrs. James G.W., Alan & Brian, Box 1588, Greensboro

MacMillan, Mrs. W. D., 406 S 3rd St., Wilmington 28401

MacLeod, Mrs. J.B., 214 Glandon Dr., Chapel Hill 27514

McKensie, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W., 800 Christopher Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Maddry, Mrs. Charles E., Mead-Haven Nursing Home, Montgomery, Ala.

Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Reese, 130 E Orange St., Hillsborough 27278

Martin, Mr. and Mrs. R.B. 405 N Cameron St., Hillsborough 27278

Massengale, Mrs. Robert, 7 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill 27514

Matheson, Miss Elizabeth, 15 E 71st St. Apt 3B, N.Y., N.Y. 10021

Miller, Miss Annie D., 2846 Brook Dr., Falls Church, Va. 22042

Miller, Miss Elizabeth Lyon., 2836 Brook Dr., Falls Church, Va. 22042

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P., Rt. 2, Hillsborough 27278

Miller, Mrs. Garland F., 218 W Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Minnis, Rev. and Mrs. J. F., Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Mitchell, Mr. William, Box 765, Hillsborough 27278

Moon, Col. and Mr. Jacob P., St Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. H.W. Jr., 7523 Piney Branch Rd., Richmond, Va. 23225

Moore, Dr. and Mrs. H.W. Moore’s Pleasure 116 W Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. William D., Tanglewood Dr., Rt. 5 Martinsville, Va. 24113

Neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. R.C., Rt. 2 Hillsborough 27278

Nicks, Mrs. S.F., 144 N. Wake St., Hillsborough 27278

Nunn, Mrs. Dorris J., 4400 Stringtown Rd., Evansville, Ind. 47711

Nunn, Mr. Leonard R., 725 Stratford Rd., Winston-Salem 27103

Ohleyer, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Jr., Box 506, Hillsborough 27278

Parish, Miss Mary E., 1913 Craig St., Raleigh 27608

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 219 Ransom St., Chapel Hill 27514

Parsley, Mrs. Oscar G., James M. and William A., S Churton St., Hillsborough 27278

Patterson, Mrs. D. E. Sr., 131 E Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. E.E., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. Quentin W., Orange grove Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Pegg, Mrs. Carl, 403 Laurel Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Pettigrew Mr. Allen, Box 1928, Raleigh

Pettit, Rev. and Mrs. Lauton, 203 E King St., Hillsborough 27278

Phipps, Judge and Mrs. L.J., 315 Pittsboro Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Piper, Mr. and Mrs. Joe H., 516 Cleveland St., Greenville, S.C. 29601

Pleasants, Dr. and Mrs. John E., 2536 Dryden Rd., Houston, Texas 77025

Preddy, Mrs. Graydon M., 2207, The Circle, Raleigh 27608

Preyer, Mr. and Mrs. L. Richardson, 605 Sunset Dr., Greensboro 27408

Prince, Mrs. S.R., High Rock Farm, Rt. 1, Reidsville

Rasberry, Mr. and Mrs. Paul H., Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Redden, Mrs. Alma C., 314 W Margaret Land, Hillsborough 27278

Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D., 2502 Wrightwood Ave., Durham 27705

Rhew, Mr. and Mrs. David C., E Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Richmond, Mr. and Mrs. J.W., Towne House, 175 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Ridenhour, Mr. and Mrs. C.A. 32 White Lane, Concord 28025

Riley, Mrs. Herbert, 130 N. Wake St., Hillsborough 27278

Rives, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence, 1704 Park Ave., Richmond, Va. 23220

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. B.W., 1503 W. Pettigrew St., Durham 27705

Roberts, Mr. Franz, Box 42, Hillsborough 27278

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. Marion B., 108 N. Hasell St., Hillsborough 27278

Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Z.R., Box 322, Hillsborough 27278

Robinson, Mrs. Martha G., Apt. P-7, Raleigh Apt., Raleigh 27602

Rogers, Mrs. Martha Lockhart, 806 Brunson Dr., Albemarle 28001

Rogers, Mrs. James Webb Sr., Beall’s Pleasure, Landover, Md. 20784

Rogers, Mr. Joseph Shepperd, Beall’s Pleasure, Landover, Md. 20784

Rollins, Mr. and Mrs. Steed, 33 Oak Dr., Durham

Rosemond, Mr. Everette, 322 Howard, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106

Royall, Col. and Mrs. Henry E., 105 Noble St., Chapel Hill 27514

Ruffin, Dr. and Mrs. Marshall, Box 4831, Quebec St. N.W., Washington D.C. 20016

Ruffin, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Brown, Box 1809, Wilmington

Ruffin, Mrs. William C., 815 Massachusetts Ave., Southern Pines 28387

Sandell, Mr. and Mrs. O.R., Pointe Aux, Mich. 499775

Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. Britton, 158 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. Bonner D., Chapel Hill Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis C., 121 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough 27278

Scott, Mr. Ralph H., Box 909, Burlington

Sharpe, Mrs. Luther, 107 S. Hasell St., Hillsborough 27278

Shepherd, Mr. Alexander R., 143 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough 27278

Shope, Mr. and Mrs. J.M., Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Sizemore, Mr. and Mrs. W.D., Rt. 7, Durham 27707

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. James. C. II, 9911 Colony Rd., Fairfax, Va.

Snipes, Mr. and Mrs. J.L., 1005 Peachtree, Dunwoody Court, Atlanta Ga. 30328

Spurgeon, Miss Carrie M., 429 Guilford Circle, Raleigh 27608

Spurgeon, Miss Mary, Hillsborough 27278

Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. Durward T., Box 168, Graham

Street, Mr. Robert B., Rt. 1, Huntersville

Strudwick, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Jr., 1800 Monument Ave., Richmond Va., 23220

Sugg, Dr. Eugene S., Rt. 1, Chapel Hill 27514

Suitt, Mr. and Mrs. Volnar R., 307 Watts St., Durham 27701

Suttenfield, Mrs. William H., Queens Towers, 1300 Queens Rd., Charlotte 28207

Sweaney, Dr. Hunter, 1007 Vickers Ave., Durham 27707

Sweaney, Miss Lois, 1002 Hill St., Durham 27707

Tally, Mr. and Mrs. Arby C., 3501 Duke Homestead Rd., Durham

Teer, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Jr., Box 853, Hillsborough 27278

Teer, Mr. and Mrs. George Sr., 145 E. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Thompson, Miss Ella Graves, Leasburg

Tinnin, Mrs. George W., 1319 Ft. Bragg Rd., Fayetteville

Todd, Mr. John Hart, P.O. Box 23, 1085 Shrine Bldg., Memphis, Tenn.

Totten, Mr. and Mrs. H. Roland, 110 Laurel Hill Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Trull, Miss Margaret L., Highlands, Hillsborough 27278

Turner, Mrs. H.M., 304 S. Seventh St., Mebane

Turner, Dr. Herbert S., 315 North Coalter St., Staunton, Va. 24401

Tyler, Mrs. E. Runyon, 1524 Hermitage Court, Durham 27707

Umstead, Mrs. Irvin E., Rt. 2, Box 14, Durham 27705

Wade, Rev. and Mrs. James H., 790 E. Stuart St., Bartow, Florida 33830

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Donald, 123 W. Union St., Hillsborough 27278

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G., Mebane

Wall, Miss Rebeca B., Heartsease, 115 E. Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Ward, Dr. Calvin L., 1726 Duke Univ. Rd., Durham 27701

Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Ira A., 1504 Michaux Rd., Chapel Hill 27514

Warren, Dr. and Mrs. A.J., Ashbrook Farm, Chester Springs, Penn. 19425

Wasden, Mrs. Charles N., 2486 Vineville Ave., Macon, Ga. 31204

Weaver, Mrs. Hazel, 2723 Lullington Dr., Winston-Salem 27103

Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. J.R., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Webb, Miss Annie R., Boylan Apts., C-103, Raleigh 27603

Webb, Miss Isabelle, 117 E. Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Webb, Mrs. John Graham, 117 E. Queen St., Hillsborough 27278

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Beverly, 2126 Norton Rd., Charlotte

Webb, Miss Louise C., 101 Ingleside Dr., Concord 28025

Webb, Mrs. Thomas H., 101 Ingleside Dr., Concord 28025

Weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Mangum, 219 N. Royal St., Alexandria, Va. 22314

Welborn, Mrs. Allen B., 717 W. Farris Ave., High Point 27260

West, Mr. and Mrs. G.H., 2744 McDowell St. Durham 27705

White, Mr. and Mrs. W.H., 1809 Independence Rd., Greensboro 27402

Whitted, Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Jr., 3710 Kirklees Rd., Winston-Salem

Williams, Mrs. Clem C., 3922 Ingomar St., Washington D.C. 20015

Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Reid, Twin Chimneys, 168 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Winecoff, Mr. and Mrs. K.C., 131 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Witherspoon, Mr. Henry Kollock, 2630 Fairview Rd., Raleigh 27608

Williamson, Mr. and Mrs. Joel R., 231 W. King St., Hillsborough 27278

Zener, Mrs. Karl E., 2727 Sparger Rd., Durham 27705

Junior Members (age through High School)

Bivins, Mr. Robert, Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough 27278

Cole, Miss Cathy, Rt. 1, Hillsborough 27278

Forrest, Miss Josephine, Glade Valley School, Glad Valley

Shope, Miss Terri Ann, Rt. 3, Hillsborough 27278

Total Membership: 509

Necrology

Brower, Mr. Alfred S., Durham

Johnston, Mr. James M., Washington, D.C.

Lockhart, Mrs. D.K., Durham

Nunn, Mrs. W.S., Chapel Hill

Shepherd, Mrs. Grant, Hillsborough

Silver, Mrs. Sprague, Raleigh

Sweaney, Mrs. Hunter, Durham

Webb, Mr. John Graham, Hillsborough

We are pleased to provide all members with this membership list of the Society. We hope this information is correct. If there are any corrections or changes of address please advise the Secretary. And, please, give us your Zip Code.

 

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 35

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

 Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol.  VII, No.  35                                  May, 1968

THE HORTICULTURE COMMITTEE

of the

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Invites you to a

ROSE PILGRIMAGE

Friday, May 17, 1968

Mrs. Charles H. Blake , Chairman of the Horticulture Committee, tells us that nineteen Hillsborough gardens will be opened to visitors on Friday, May 17, 1968. Mr. Richard Thompson, of Wynnwood, Pennsylvania, author of “Old Roses for Modern Gardens”, Mr. William Lanier Hunt of Chapel Hill, and Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Merritt of Mount Airy, will help us name a hundred of our old roses, many of which have survived from the early days of Hillsborough’s settlement.

 

Hillsborough is blessed with a number of these old roses from gardens of long ago, cherished down through the years, as are “Granny’s Rose”, and the “Velvet” and “Shell” roses in Mrs. Alex Anderson’s garden; the “Sweetheart Rose” at Mrs. Bryan Roberts’; the “Blue Rose” at Eno Lodge. The “Mary Burke Rose” at Heartsease was named for Miss Polly, Governor Burke’s daughter, who taught school in a little house in the garden.

 

The “Seven Sisters Rose” in the garden of the Nash Law Office on Margaret Lane is said to be one hundred and fifty years old, and it may well be true. The great “China Rose” bushes in the garden of Hooper House are known to have been growing there for at least a hundred years.

 

Many of us remember the early teas, “Pink Duchess” and “Sapano”, in our grandmothers’ gardens, for they have always been greatly beloved in the South.  The Burwell School cherishes its old “Musk Cluster” bush, mentioned by Thomas Ruffin. The “Chestnut Burr Rose” and the “Old Blush” make great bushes here, and the early “Crimson China Rose” may be found in constant bloom.

 

Mrs. George Gilmore has collected old roses over the years. Many of them she found growing in the tangles surrounding deserted homes. We hope that her white Centifolia bush will be in bloom for you. We shall let our experts identify our roses and label them, but many of you may prefer the older names.

The Pilgrimage will be held between the hours of ten and twelve in the morning and from one to five in the afternoon. There will be an Exhibit of Old Roses in Strudwick Hall at the Hillsborough Presbyterian Church, West Tryon and Churton Streets, from three to five, at which time tea will be served.

 

In case of rain the Pilgrimage will be held on Saturday, May 18.

 

Admission will be by Tour Folder – cost $1.00 each.

 

Folders may be obtained at the Old Court House, East King and Churton Streets. Guides and hostesses will assist visitors in finding the roses.

 

Chairmen assisting Mrs. Blake are :

Old Rose Exhibit – – Mrs. H. R. Totten

Mrs. Floyd Edmister

Tea – – – – – – – – – – – – Mrs. Robert Isley

Mrs. J.A. Warren

Hostesses – – – – – – – Mrs. Van Kenyon

Mrs. Glen Auman

 

Mrs. Blake and the entire Horticulture Committee look forward to meeting and welcoming Society members, gardeners of District IX of The Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc. to whom a special invitation has been extended and to all interested friends.

 

********

 

Projects Committee – – Mrs. W.H. Moore and Mrs. Erle G. Hill, Co-Chairmen, report that plans have been completed and construction begun on uniform signs which will identify the historic homes in Hillsborough. Mr. Tommy Leonard and his construction class at Orange High School are making the signs. Lettering will be done by Mr. Jerry Jarrell of Major Business Forms, Inc., Hillsborough. The Maintenance Department, Town of Hillsborough under the direction of Mr. Fred Sharpe will install the signs within the Town.

 

********

 

Orange County Historical Museum – – February, 1968 marked the 10th Anniversary of the museum. On February 25, a special program commemorating this anniversary was presented at the Museum. The feature of the program was the “History of the Museum”, by Rev. J.F. Missis, member of the Museum board.

 

Appropriately throughout the month there was a special exhibit – – Old Tin. A new case contained the items collected for the event. From the extensive tin collection of Mrs. D.E. Hollandsworth, Maple Hill:

 

Reflector Lamp          1870                           Steam pudding mold                        1870

Pepper boxes                        1880                           Small spice box                      1830

Flutted molds                        1890                           Large spice box                     1830

Shaker                                    1830                           Cookie cutters                        1870

Cookie Jar                   1870                           Lamps                                     1870

Small Buckets                        1876                           Tallow Dippers                      1820

Steam pudding mold                                    Miniature lard bucket          1876

Jelly glass lid              1870                           Fluted cake pan

Sweet potato grater                                      Turtle mold                            1870

Double loaf pan                                             Coffee pot                              1870

Hand made griddle pan – – made for use at Maple Hill – – 1820

 

Loaned by Mrs. A.H. Graham – – Tole cake box – – 1870

Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. Dalton Riley – – Candle Mold, six candles

Loaned by Mr. Calvin Warren – – Lantern 1760

Loaned by Mrs. C.D. Jones – – Tintype of her mother, Annie H. Sockwell

Hand painted tin picture – – 1860

Light reflector – – – – – – – – – – 1870

Loaned by Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Blake – – Sewing box, inscribed

with name, S.F. Blake – – 1830

Loaned by Mrs. C.F. Dority – – – – – Two 6”x8” tintypes

Steeple pan – – – – – 1860

Loaned by Mrs. E.M. Lockhart – – – Sand-tart shells – – – – – 1870

Milk pail – – – – – – – – – 1860

 

From the Museum’s permanent collection – –

Foot-warmer – – carried in his buggy by Dr. C.D. Jones, a physician in Hillsborough for fifty years – – donated by Mrs. C.D. Jones.

 

Nutmeg grater – – 1870 – – given by Mrs. Hazel Dority Weaver

Egg Beater – – – – – 1870 – – given by Mrs. W.T. Rice

Candle Stand – – – 1820 – – used at Nash Kollock School

 

Pig of Tin (weight 60 pounds) contributed to the exhibit by Mrs. Sam Beard, Dept. of Archives and History. In 1962 divers, supervised by Archives and History staff, recovered pigs of tin from the ship wrecked Confederate runner, “Modern Greece”, which was chased aground by Federal gunboats off the coast of Ft. Fisher, N.C., June 17, 1862.

 

Tin, invaluable in time of war, was used for plating canteens, eating utensils and varous implements; for making pewter and for mixing with lead for the molding of “MINIE” bullets and other rifle and musket projectiles.

 

April was a particularly busy month at the Museum. Group visitors included:

Eight seventh grade classes – – Orange Jr. High School

Prof. Durward Stokes’ history classes – – Elon College

Geology Wives – – Duke University (National Meeting)

REA Wives – – (District Meeting)

Two Raleigh Garden Clubs

A Reidsville Garden Club

A High Point Garden Club

A Book Club from Roxboro

 

Currently on loan to the Museum is a 40 piece exhibit of East Indian brass. This interesting collection is the property of Rev. and Mrs. J.F. Minnis, acquired during their many years as missionaries in India.

* * * * * * * * *

 

Membership – – 517

 

New Members:

Miss Catherine Graham Auman, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia

Miss Mary E. Parish, Raleigh

Rev. and Mrs. Lauton Petit, Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Reynolds, Durham

Miss Teri Ann Shope, Jr. Member, Hillsborough

Mrs. E. M. Lockhart, Membership Chairman, regrets to announce that our active and helpful members, Rev. and Mrs. James H. Wade are leaving Hillsborough, moving to Bartow, Florida. We hope that they will continue their membership in the Society. They will be missed.

 

* * * * * * * * *

 

CONFEDERATE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Hillsborough held Open House the week of April 22. Mrs. Joel Williamson and Mrs. John Mason Roberts awarded prizes for best posters and essays to a number of Orange County School children. Mrs. E.M. Lockhart and Mrs. George Teer, board members served cookies, punch and coffee.

 

ABOUT TOWN

Green Hill to live again. The Johnston Home, one of the oldest structures in Orange County has been moved from its original location, land now owned by Fiber Industries, Inc. to Lawrence Road and US 70, Hillsborough. Mr. and Mrs. James H. Coman are restoring the house and plan to make it their home.

 

Mrs. Coman tells us that three rooms on the first floor date from 1750 and the rest of the floor from 1810. The Comans are doing a magnificent restoration and plan to call their home Green Hill, its original name. We hope to provide a complete history of this interesting house in a later issue.

 

The Gattis house, West King Street, has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Britton Sawyer. It has been renovated attractively. Of special interest is the old hexagonal well house which has been restored.

 

Twin Chimneys, West King Street, has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Williams and will soon become their residence.

 

* * * * * * * * *

COMING EVENTS

Picnic at HUGHES ACADEMY – – June 23 at 5 P.M. A short program is being planned. After the program a picnic. Bring your picnic basket. It is hoped that everyone will enjoy a pleasant Sunday Evening at this quiet, historic spot. Plan to visit the old Eno Cemetery nearby.

* * * * * * * * *

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 34

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol.  VII, No.  34                 February, 1968

 

Please mark your calendars now for the first program of 1968. The Historical Society is delighted to present a well known member, a native of Hillsborough,

 

DR. MARION B. ROBERTS

in a talk on

COL. TEW AND THE HILLSBOROUGH MILITARY ACADEMY

March 8, 1968 – 8: P.M.

Orange County Courthouse

 

All members and friends of the Society are invited.

 

OUR OFFICERS for 1968 –    President – Mr. Dalton H. Loftin

Vice-President – Dr. L.W. Carroll

Secretary – Mr. Jack Reese Martin

Treasurer – Mr. Marion M. Clark

 

ADVISORY BOARD                 Miss Elizabeth H. Collins

Mrs. John Graham Webb

Mr. James H. Coman

Mrs. Marion B. Roberts

Dr. Charles H. Blake

 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN     Projects – Mrs. H.W. Moore

Mrs. Erle G. Hill, Co. Chm.

Publicity – Mrs. K.C. Winecoff

Publications – Mrs. David C. Rhew

Horticulture – Mrs. Charles H. Blake

Membership – Mrs. E.M. Lockhart

Museum-Liason – Mrs. Clarence D. Jones

Program – Dr. George B. Daniel, Jr.

Mr. Grady Brown, Co. Chm.

Property – Mrs. Robert W. Isley

News-Letter – Mrs. William Hopewell

 

MEMBERSHIP – 510 as of February, 1968

 

We have started the year with the largest number of members in the history of the Society. May we remind those members who have not paid their dues for 1968 to please do so now. We hope that it will not be necessary to delete any names from the list of active members. For your convenience a form is available on the last page of this NEWS-LETTER.

 

NEW ANNUAL MEMBERS:

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Dickson, Hillsborough

Mrs. Billie Copeland, Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard, Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Donald V. Holliday, Enfield

Dr. Harold J. Dudley, Raleigh

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Hughes, New Bern

Miss Ima Hogg, Houston, Texas

 

DEATHS: Membership Chairman Mrs. E.M. Lockhart regrets to announce the loss by death of our valued members:

Mr. James M. Johnston, Washington, D.C.

Mr. John Graham Webb, Hillsborough

Mrs. Sprague Silver, Raleigh

 

* * * * * * *

 

HIGH – LIGHTS – 1967

A very successful (in spite of less than favorable weather) SPRING TOUR, April 22 and 23. Six houses and gardens and the Burwell School (by courtesy of the Historic Hillsborough Commission as headquarters for four Antique Dealers) were opened to the public. Churches and public buildings were opened. Special events featured included downtown window displays, a craft house, a slides program featuring films and narrative of Hillsborough houses, Colonial children’s dances, band concerts, a square dance demonstration, and food provided by the Orange Grove Grange. We are grateful to the Society’s members and to all the cooperating community organizations whose efforts made success possible.

ACQUIRED REAL PROPERTY – THE HUGHES ACADEMY

See NEWS-LETTER No. 32 for details.

 

GRAHAM PORTRAITS unveiled at ORANGE COUNTY COURTHOUSE in an impressive ceremony on December 2. The Society was in no way responsible for these portraits. We do express gratitude and appreciation to our member, Mrs. Alexander H. Graham of Hillsborough who donated oil portraits of John Washington Graham and Governor William Alexander Graham to hang on the wall to the right and left of the judge’s bench and the front of the County Courtroom.

 

Painted by Frances Everett of Suffolk, Virginia the portraits are the first to be given to the County for display in the courtroom.

 

The portrait of John Washington Graham was unveiled by his great grand-daughter, Kathleen Long Graham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Washington Graham of Raleigh. The presentation address was made by the Honorable R. Hunt Parker, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. The portrait of Governor William Alexanger Graham was unveiled by his great, great grand-daughter, Margaret Etheridge Graham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.H. Graham, Jr. of Durham. Dr. John V. Allcott, professor of art at the University of N.C. – Chapel Hill, made the presentation address.

 

In accepting the portraits on behalf of the Orange County Commissioners, Lucius M. Cheshire said, “If one person sees these portraits and is inspired by them to go into our past, then the generosity of Mrs. Graham will be recognized.” May we urge all members of the Society to visit the Orange County Courtroom and see the handsome portraits of these famous men of Orange County.

 

ENGSTROM AWARD presented to Mrs. E.M. Lockhart at Annual Meeting. This award in honor of Mrs. Alfred G. Engstrom is presented annually to the person whom the society feels has contributed most to the organization during the year. Mrs. Lockhart, a charter member, has served the Society as membership chairman for a number of years. It was with obvious pleasure that she announced at the Annual Meeting that the membership exceeded 500. Mrs. Lockhart is most interested in all the activities of the Society and is always able and willing to assist wherever needed. In presenting to her the ENGSTROM AWARD we say, “Thank you, Mrs. Lockhart”.

 

PLAQUE placed on the Berry Brick House. A handsome bronze plaque now permanently identifies this historic house on West Queen Street, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ross Porter. Funds for this plaque were given by the descendants of Capt. John Berry, builder of the house.

 

PHILLIPS-LOCKHART CEMETERY – This old family cemetery on East Tryon Street received extensive attention by your Projects Committee. The wall has been restored; steps were erected; weeds and debris were removed and grass planted; and a bronze identification plaque placed on the front wall.

 

ANNONYMOUS GIFT of $100 for the Moses Ashley Curtis Memorial Garden. Mr. Clark, Society Treasurer, was visited by a special messenger who presented him with a $100 to be used in the development of the Garden. We say, “Thank you, so much”, to this unknown donor.

 

THE COMMANDANT’S HOUSE, the only remaining building of the Hillsborough Military Academy, the home of Col. Charles Courtney Tew, one of the Academy founders is now owned and occupied by Mrs. Carl C. Davis and Mrs. And Mrs. Lucius Cheshire, Society members. It has been restored… Hopefully this interesting castle-like structure, built in 1860, will be opened for the next general Tour.

 

NASH LAW OFFICE, owned by Judge J.L. Phipps, Chairman of the Historic Hillsborough Commission and Society member is now rented on a long-term lease by Mr. Alexander R. Shepherd, also a member of the Society. Mr. Shepherd, with Judge Phipps’ approval has made extensive repairs and is now restoring the interior. He is trying to preserve all the old features. The charming old garden in the rear is being cared for and enhanced. Watch for this historical building on the next Tour.

 

VISITORS – Many groups, garden clubs, literary clubs, professional organizations, ets. and innumerable student groups have visited Hillsborough during the past year. Requests for guided tours are increasing. Your Projects Committee assumes the responsibility for planning with adult groups. The Orange County Historical Museum continues to plan the program for student groups. Rarely can a private home be shown to such visitors. We must remember that our historic houses are occupied as private homes. The owners have been most gracious to open them for the bi-annual Spring Tour of the Society. We cannot invade their privacy by requesting the admission of small individual groups.

 

AT THE MUSEUM

 

A beautiful going away dress, worn by Mary Howard Smith who married Eben Alexander in 1874 is on exhibit. This dress has been loaned by Dr. Howard Patterson.

 

A collection of old china dolls (1860-1890). This is a most interesting display, the loan of Mrs. C.F. Dority, a member of the Museum Board and of the Society. Mrs. Dority is an authority on old dolls. Those currently on exhibit are beautiful. Each costume is complete and appropriate to the period (even to underpinnings). All costumes have been created by Mrs. Dority from old fabrics.

 

A display of Victorian bisque figurines, also the loan of Mrs. Dority.

 

The January meeting of the Hillsborough Garden Club was held at the Museum on January 18. Dr. Charles H. Blake presented a slide program with commentary relating the scenes portrayed in the Museum murals, “The Freedom Road”, to present day Hillsborough.

 

February, 1968 is the 10th anniversary of the Museum. Since tin is traditionally the symbol of the 10th anniversary a special exhibit of old tin has been prepared. This special exhibit may be seen from February 15th until March 15th.

 

May we again remind our members, the Orange County Museum is not static. New acquisitions are being added continuously. From time to time there are temporary exhibits. The Museum is a place which merits re-visiting.

 

* * * * * * *

COMING EVENTS

May 17, (rain date, May 18) – Rose Pilgrimage, sponsored by the Horticulture Committee of the Society. This will be a study of about 100 old roses in 19 Hillsborough gardens, planned primarily for members of District 9 of the Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc. The experts will be Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Merritt, Mt. Airy and Mr. William Lanier Hunt, Chapel Hill.

 

Registration and Tour Folders, $1.00 at the Old Court House.

 

Hours – 10 A.M. – 12 Noon

1 P.M. – 5 P.M.

Tea and an exhibit old Old Roses 3 – 5 P.M. – Strudwick Hall

 

Society Members are invited.

 

June, 1968 (exact date to be announced) – Picnic at the Hughes Academy.

 

APPEAL

 

This spring, The Historic Hillsborough Commission, through the Friends of Hillsborough Committee, will make an appeal for funds to continue the restoration of the Burwell School. For the first time the membership of the Society will be included in the appeal. The Burwell School is not a Society project. When the restoration is completed, however, it is hope that each member will maintain a head-quarters room there. We hope that each member of the Society will be interested in helping complete this project.

 

* * * * * *

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 33

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol.  VI, No.  33           October, 1967

CALL TO THE 1967 ANNUAL MEETING

– – – – – – – – – – –

Friday Evening

October 13, 1967                                                 8:00P.M.

The New Courthouse

Hillsborough, N.C.

– – – – – – – – – – – –

All members and friends of the Hillsborough Historical Society are invited to attend the sixth Annual Meeting of the Society on Friday evening, October 13, 1967, at 8:00 P.M. in the New Courthouse, Hillsborough.

 

Our guest Speaker will be:

MR. A.B. CAMMACK, Chairman

 

Resource and Conservation Development Program for the 6 County Area

 

Mr. Cammack will talk about “What this Program can do for the Society and what the Society can do for the Program”.

 

– – – – – – – – – – – –

 

After a business session, the Society will elect its officers for the 1967-1968 year. The Nominating Committee (Miss Mary B. Forrest, Chm., Mrs. Dalton H. Loftin, and Mr. Wilson Cole) submits to the Society the following slate of officers for 1967 – 1968:

 

President                                                                 – Mr. Dalton H. Loftin

 

Vice- President                                                          – Dr. L.W. Carroll

 

Secretary                                                             – Mr. Jack Reese Martin

Treasurer                                                                – Mr. Marion M. Clark

Board Member                                                   – Miss Elizabeth H. Collins

5 year term replacing

Mr. H. Conway Browning whose

term has expired.

These four members are                               – Mrs. John Graham Webb

serving continuing terms                                                    (4 year term)

and are not subject to                                    – Mrs. James H. Coman

re-election                                                                         (3 year term)

– Mrs. Marion B. Roberts

(2 year term)

– Dr. Charles H. Blake

(1 year term)

 

Note: Any individual member of the Society may make a nomination for any office by (1) securing the consent of the nominee, and (2) transmitting his nomination in writing to the Secretary at least five days before the Annual Meeting. Such a written nomination must contain a statement to the effect that the nominee or nominees have consented to their names being placed in nomination and that they will serve in the respective offices.

*******************

MEMBERSHIP ROLL, 1967

The Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.

(Year ending December 31, 1967)

HONORARY MEMBER

Nash, Mrs. Frank, Box 482, Hillsborough

LIFE MEMBERS

Blake, Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Chatwood, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce, Box 395, Durham, N.C.

Cotton, Mrs. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Draper-Savage, Mr. Edward T., Moorefields, Hillsborough, N.C.

Engstrom, Dr. and Mrs. Alfred G. 118 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Holeman, Miss Jean, 109 Forest Wood Drive, Durham, N.C.

Johnston, Mr. James M., 900 Southern Bldg., Washington D.C.

Kenan, Mr. Frank H., Box 2537 N. Durham Station, Durham, N.C.

McKenna, Mrs. Richard M., 11 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Roberts, Mr. John Mason, W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Stoney, Mrs. A.B., 509 W. Union St., Morganton, N.C.

CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS

Bason, Mrs. George F., 737 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill

Berry, Mr. and Mrs. John, 2122 N. Lakeshore Dr., Chapel Hill

Borland, Judge and Mrs. A.H., 1600 High St., Durham

Brower, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S., 2543 Sevier St., Durham

Browning, Mr. H. Conway, 1 Mile SE of St. Mary’s, Hillsborough

Cotton, Dr. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill

Crawford, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M., Colonial Inn, Hillsborough

Daniel, Dr. and Mrs. George B. Jr., 2 Gooseneck Rd., Chapel Hill

Dillingham, Mr. and Mrs. George M., 1401 Caswell Road, Chapel Hill

Gay, Mr. and Mrs. James E., Jr., 754 N. Stratford Rd., Winston-Salem

Graves, Mrs. Louis, 111 Battle Lane, Chapel Hill

Hopewell, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr., Rt. 2, Hillsborough

Kellenberger, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 806 Parkway, Greensboro

Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. S.S., Ayrmount, Hillborough

Labouisse, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Fairntosh, Box 8005, Durham

Lindsay, Mrs. Hal, 1803 Ridgewood Dr., Atlanta, Ga.

Murphy, Dr. and Mrs. Robert J., Seven Hearths, Hillsborough

Orgain, Mrs. Edward S., 3321 Devon Rd., Durham

Scott, Mrs. Don E., Sr., 619 N. Main St., Graham

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Young M. Jr., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough

Turner, Maj. Frances B., B-3, 105 Riverside Park, Hopewell, Va.

Von Lennep, Mme. Eric N., Didam, Bridgewater, Conn.

Wager, Dr. Paul W., 206 University Drive, Chapel Hill

Walser, Prof. Richard, Box 5308, Raleigh

Warren, Mrs. J.A., 301 Hillsborough St., Chapel Hill

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. James, 511 Cornwallis Drive, Greensboro

ANNUAL MEMBERS

Altvater, Mr. and Mrs. F.V., 771 York St., Denver, Colorado

Anderson, Dr. and Mrs. Carl L., Cabe Ford Farm, Rt. 2, Durham

Andrews, Dr. Nita, Bolin Brook Farm, Rt. 1, Chapel HIll

Andrews, Dr. and Mrs. T.M., Bolin Brook Farm, Rt. 1, Chapel Hill

Arrasmith, Mrs. Wm. Strudwick, 329 N. Bonner Ave. St. Matthews, Louisville, Ky.

Auman, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn, Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Bain, Mrs. R. Allan, 607 West Front St., Burlington

Ballard, Mr. and Mrs. John, Box 927, Hillsborough

Barbour, Mrs. Nancy C., Appinwood Farm, Hillsborough

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. E.P., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough

Beard, Mr. and Mrs. L.E., 134 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough

Beeler, Dr. and Mrs. James Rush, 608 Jamestown Rd., Williamsburg, Va.

Berry, Mrs. Mary Strudwick, 304 Wentworth Dr., Greensboro

Bivins, Mr. and Mrs. O.E., Hillsborough

Bivins, Mr. Thomas E., Hillsborough

Blackley, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J., Rt. 1, Happy Valley Farm, Hillsborough

Blackwood, Miss Mattie E., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill

Blaine, Prof, J.C.D., Greenwood Road, Chapel Hill

Blalock, Mr. and Mrs. Julian H., 100 Cherokee Rd., Hampton, Va.

Bloodworth, Mrs. T.S.M., 963 Wellington Rd., Winston-Salem

Bond, Prof. and Mrs. Richmond P., 101 Pine Lane, Chapel Hill

Bonds, Mrs. Louise M., 3754 Faxon Ave., Memphis, Tenn.

Booker, Mr. Curtis, Box 3760, N.C. State University, Raleigh

Booker, Mr. and Mrs. John G., Rt. 2, Chapel Hill

Boone, Dr. and Mrs. W. Waldo, 3921 Nottaway Rd., Durham

Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. Spotswood, 3018 Randolph Drive, Raleigh

Brinton, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh P., 12 Davie Circle, Chapel Hill

Brody, Dr. and Mrs. Irvin A., Hwy 70, Hillsborough

Brown, Miss Estelle, Methodist Home, Erwin Rd., Durham

Brown, Mr. Grady A., Occoneechee Farm, Hillsborough

Brown, Mrs. H.H. 4925 Camino Real. Tucson, Arizona.

Brown, Miss Joyce, 4925 Camino Real, Tucson, Arizona.

Brown, Mr. Henry N. III, 3687 Northwood Drive, Memphis, Tenn.

Browning, Miss Kate, Rt. 2, Durham

Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. Victor S., Sr., 11012 Vickers Ave., Durham

Burke, Miss Evelyn F., 6300 Richmond Place, Norfolk, Va.

Caldwell, Mrs. A. Leroy, 809 Hermitage Court Dr., Durham

Cameron, Miss Annie S., Box 644, Hillsborough

Carr, Mr. and Mrs. G. Paul, Box 627, Hillsborough

Carr, Mrs. W.C., 106 S. Tremont Dr., Greensboro

Carroll, Mrs. Adrian, 627 Fountain Place. Burlington

Carroll, Dr. and Mrs. L.W., Box 475, Hillsborough

Carter, Dr. and Mrs. Bayard, 2111 Myrtle Dr., Durham

Carter, Miss Grace, 361 Miller St., S.W., Winston-Salem

Carter, Miss Mary L., 361 Miller St., S.W., Winston-Salem

Carter, Miss Ruth, 361 Miller St., S.W., Winston-Salem

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Fred S., Jr., 112 W. Union St., Hillsborough

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, Jr., Box 167, Hillsborough

Caviness, Dr. and Mrs. Verne S., 109 N. Boylan Ave., Raleigh

Chesire, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius M., 118 E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Clare, Mrs. Edwin, 3509 Sheridan Drive, Durham

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Marion M., Hillsborough

Clayton, Mrs. Louise R., 121 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough

Claytor, Mr. and Mrs. Fred T., West Margaret Lane, Hillsborough

Cleland, Dr. and Mrs. James T., 2117 Myrtle Dr., Durham

Cobb, Mrs. Collier & Miss Mary L., 517 E. Franklin St., Chapell Hill

Cobb, Mr. and Mrs. Collier, Jr., 603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill

Coker, Mr. C.F.W., Box 1563, Raleigh

Cole, Mrs. C.C., Box 431, Hillsborough

Cole, Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Jr., Rt. 1, Hillsborough

Cole Mr. and Mrs. E. Wilson, St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough

Collins, Miss Elizabeth, Highlands, Hillsborough

Collins, Col. H.W., 809 Elizabeth St., Ft. Collins, Colorado.

Coman, Mr. and Mrs. James H., Jr., Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Copeland, Mr. and Mrs. Eric H., 1007 Norwood Ave., Durham

Couch, Mr. and Mrs. Jean, Gulf Oil Co., Hillsborough

Craig, Miss Jean, 706 Piedmont St., Reidsville

Craig, Mr. Luther M., 104 Hilton Ave., Durham

Crumpacker, Miss Louise, 1405 Welcome Circle, Durham

Currie, Mr. and Mrs. John M., Carthage

Coley, Mrs. Gladys L., Box 381, Hillsborough

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Archie R., 52 Beverly Drive, Durham

Davis, Mrs. Carl, E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Dority, Mrs. C.F., W. King St., Hillsborough

Dowdy, Mr. and Mrs. E.R., 408 N. Churton St., Hillsborough

DuBose, Mr. and Mrs. D. St. Pierre, Box 310, Durham

Duckett, Mrs. E. DuVal, Blanch – 2419 King St., Alexandria, Va. (Winter)

Dwelle, Mrs. Mary M., 314 Hempstead Place, Charlotte

Edmister, Mrs. Floyd, Rt. 1, Univ. Lake Drive, Chapel Hill

Efland, Mrs. Lindsay, Box 97, Efland

Eskridge, Mrs. J.D., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough

Felts, Mrs. Frances Carter, 217 B., New Drive, Apt. D., Winston-Salem

Ffrench, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R., 2400 Belvedere Dr., Baytown, Texas

Flinn, Mrs. Lawrence, Lilly Pond Lane, E. Hampton, Long Island, N.Y.

Forrest, Mr. and Mrs. Bedford B., Hillsborough

Flower, Mr. and Mrs. Walter D., 12 Claremont Ave., Maplewood, New Jersey

Forrest, Mrs. Louise, Hillsborough

Forrest, Miss Mary B., Hillsborough

Forrest, Mrs. Robert O., West Cobb Dormitory, UNC., Chapel Hill

Fowler, Mr. and Mrs. M.M., 2023 Club Blvd. Durham

Franck, Mrs. Martha L., 801 Onslow St., Durham

Frick, Mrs. Arthur C., 2621 N. Summit Ave., Milwaukee, Wis.

Fudge, Rev. and Mrs. Sam, Rt. 3, Box 143, Hillsborough

Gardiner, Mrs. Leo, Box 575, Chapel Hill

Gattis, Miss Jean, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem

Gattis, Mrs. Virginia, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs. B.P., Jr., Box 195, Hillsborough

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs, B.P., Sr., 209 W. King St., Hillsborough

Graham, Mr. and Mrs. A.H., Montrose, Hillsborough

Graham, Dr. and Mrs. William A., 2247 Cranford Rd., Durham

Gulick, Mr. and Mrs. H.E., Hillsborough

Gilmore, Mr. and Mrs. G.W., Box 86, Hillsborough

Gilmore, Miss Jill, Box 86, Hillsborough

Hall, Dr. and Mrs. C.B., 1835 Eye St., N.W., Washington 6, D.C.

Hamlin, Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Hillsborough

Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. B.S., 1057 Latham Rd., Decatur, Georgia

Hayes, Miss Sue B., Hillborough

Herndon, Mr. and Mrs. Fred J., Massey’s Chapel Road, Hillsborough

Hicks, Mr. and Mrs. Frank D., Ridgewood Lane, Chapel Hill

Hill, Mr.s. Erle G., 173 Margaret Lane, Hillsborough

Holden, Mr. John A., Box 373, La Place, La.

Hollandsworth, Mr. and Mrs. D.E., Maple Hill Farm, Rt., Hillsborough

Hooper, Mrs. R.L., 510 Woodlawn Ave., Greensboro

Hopkins, Mrs. Florence B., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill

Hubbard, Rev. and Mrs. C.S., 1206 Branch St., Wilson

Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. J.P., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough

Hughes, Mrs. Robert D., Cedar Grove

Hunt, Miss Helen L., Box 469, Chapel Hill

Harrington, Mr. and Mrs. A. Phillip, 310 West Pine St., Graham

Hughes, Mr. Joe P. Jr., Davidson College, Davidson

Hughes, Mr. R.M., Woodbriar Rd., Winston-Salem

Hughes, Miss Elizabeth, 233 Andrews Ave., Henderson

 

Isenhour, Mr. and Mrs. Vance, Rt. 1, Hillsborough

Isley, Mr. and Mrs. R.W., Cedar Grove

Ives, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest, Paint Hill Farm, Southern Pines

James, Mrs. C.J., and Miss Charlotte Rhow, W. Tryon St., Hillsborough

Jervis, Mr. and Mrs. Carl, 525 Concord Lane, Smyrna, Georgia

Jervis, Mr. R.M., Rt. 2, Old Hillsborough Rd., Chapel Hill

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence D., Eno Lodge, Hillsborough

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L., 133 Hale St., Beverly, Mass.

Jones, Mrs. Kenneth R. II, Box 116, Vanceboro

Kenion, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S., Rt. 4, Box 400, WIlson

Kenyon, Mr. and Mrs. Van L., Rt. 2, Hillsborough

Knight, Mr. and Mrs. C.D., Box 201, Hillsborough

Latta, Mr. and Mrs. Harold F., Hwy. 57 N., Hillsborough

Laws, Mr. and Mrs. J.E., 309 N. Churton St., Hillsborough

LeGrand, Mrs. John Q., Box 428, Chapel Hill

Lester, Mrs. Robert M., 606 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. H.H., 1402 Virginia Ave., Durham

Lineberger, Mrs. Adrian, Sr., 2 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill

Link, Mr. and Mrs. J.M., Rt. 2, Durham

Little, Mrs. William B., 608 Wanaka Circle, Wadesboro

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Allen A., W. Tyron St., Hillsborough

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Jr., Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Sr., Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Lloyd, Mrs. T.E., West Queen St., Hillsborough

Lloyd, Miss Nellie G., 707 Shepard St., Durham

Lockhart, Mrs. Christine C., Presbyterian Church, Chapel Hill

Lockhart, Mrs. D.K., 805 Watts St., Durham

Lockhart, Mrs. E.M., 109 N. Wake St., Hillsborough

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. E.M., Jr., 516 Platt Terrace, Aiken, S.C.

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. John K., 309 Wrenn Ave., Mount Airy

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. L.B., 186 E. Wesley Rd., N.E., Atlanta, Ga.

Loftin, Mr. and Mrs. Dalton H., N. Cameron St., Hillsborough

Lynch, Mr. Edwin M., 312 N. Churton St., Hillsborough

Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. William F., Box 212, Hillsborough

MacLamroc, Mr. and Mrs. James G.W., Allan & Brian, Box 1588, Greensboro

McMillan, Mrs. W.D., 406 S. 3rd St., Wilmington

MacLeod, Mrs. John Blount, 214 Glandon Drive, Chapel Hill

McCulley, Miss Dorothy Jane, 3754 Faxon Ave., Memphis, Tenn.

McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W., 800 Christopher Rd., Chapel Hill

Maadry, Mrs. Charles E., Mead-Haven Nursing Home, Montgomery, Ala.

Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Reese, Box 886, Hillsborough

Martin, Mr. and Mrs. R.B., Box 964, Hillsborough

Massengale, Mrs. Robert, 7 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill

Matheson, Mr. and Mrs. D.S., Tryon St., Hillsborough

Matheson, Miss Elizabeth, 15 East 71st St., Apt. 3B, New York, N.Y.

Miller, Mrs. Annie D., 2836 Brook Drive, Falls Church, Va.

Miller, Miss Elizabeth Lyon, 1836 Brook Drive, Falls Church, Va.

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P., Rt. 2, Hillsborough

Miller, Mrs. Garland F., 218 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough

Minnis, Rev. and Mrs. J.F., Rt. 3, Box 42, Hillsborough

Mitchell, Mr. William, Box 765, Hillsborough

Moon, Col. And Mrs. Jacob P., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. H.W. Jr., 7523 Piney Branch Rd., Richmond, Virginia

Moore, Dr. and Mrs. H.W., 116 W. Queen St., Hillsborough

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. William D., Tanglewood Dr., Rt. 5, Martinsville, Va.

Neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. R.C., Box 763, Hillsborough

Nicks, Mrs. S.F., 144 N. Wake St., Hillsborough

Noble, Miss Alice, 214 Hillsborough St., Chapel Hill

Nunn, Mrs. Dorris J., 4400 Stringtown Road, Evansville, Indiana

Nunn, Mr. Leonard R., 726 Stratford Road, Winston-Salem

Nunn, Mrs. Lockett, P.O. Box 596, Evansville, Indiana

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 219 Ransom St., Chapel Hill

Parsley, Mrs. Oscar G., James M., and William A., Churton St., Hillsborough

Patterson, Mrs. D.E. Sr., 131 E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. E.E., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. Quentin W., Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough

Patton, Mr. and Mrs. James R., 1118 W. Forest Hills Blvd., Durham

Pegg, Mrs. Carl, 403 Laurel Rd., Chapel Hill

Pettigrew, Mr. Allen, Box 1928, Raleigh

Phipps, Judge and Mrs. L.J., 315 Pittsboro St., Chapel Hill

Piper, Mr. and Mrs. Joe H., 516 Cleveland St., Greenville, S.C.

Pleasants, Dr. and Mrs. John E., 2536 Dryden Rd., Houston, Texas

Pollard, Mr. W.R., Box 616, Chapel Hill

Preddy, Mrs. Graydon M., 2207 The Circle, Raleigh

Preyer, Mr. and Mrs. L. Richardson, 605 Sunset Drive, Greensboro

Prince, Mrs. S.R. High Rock Farm, Rt. 1, Reidsville

Rape, Mrs. Harvey, 207 Pineview Road, Durham

Rasberry, Mr. and Mrs. Paul H., Hillsborough

Redden, Mrs. Alma C., 314 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough

Rhew, Mr. and Mrs. David C., E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Richmond, Mr. and Mrs. J.W., 175 W. King St., Hillsborough

Ridenhour, Mr. and Mrs. C.A., 32 White Lane, Concord

Riley, Mrs. Herbert, 130 N. Wake St., Hillsborough

Rives, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence, 1704 Park Ave., Richmond 20, Va.

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. B.W., 1503 Pettigrew St., Durham

Roberts, Mr. Franz, Box 42, Hillsborough

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. Marion B., 108 N. Hazel St., Hillsborough

Robinson, Mrs. Martha G., Apt. 9-7-Raleigh Apt, Raleigh

Rogers, Mrs. Martha Lockhart, 806 Brunson Dr., Albemarle

Rogers, Mrs. James Webb Sr., Beall’s Pleasure, Landover, Maryland

Rogers, Mr. Joseph Shepperd, Beall’s Pleasure, Landover, Maryland

Rollins, Mr. and Mrs. Steed, 33 Oak Drive, Durham

Rosemond, Mr. Everette, 1400 Central Ave., S.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico

Royall, Col. And Mrs. Henry E., 105 Noble St., Chapel Hill

Ruffin, Dr. and Mrs. Marshall, Box 4831, Quebec St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Ruffin, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Brown, Box 1809, Wilmington, N.C.

Ruffin, Mrs. William C., 815 E. Massachusetts Ave., Southern Pines

Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Z.R., Box 322, Hillsborough

Sandell, Mrs. O.R., Hwy. 70A East, Hillsborough

Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. Britton, Hillsborough

Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. Bonner, Hillsborough

Scott, Mrs. Cutris C., 121 W. Tyron St., Hillsborough

Scott, Mr. Ralph H., Box 909, Burlington

Sharpe, Mrs. Luther, 107 S. Hazel St., Hillsborough

Sheffer, Mrs. Charlotte, Box 115, Richwoods, Missouri

Shepherd, Mr. Alex R., Box 213, Hillsborough

Shepherd, Mrs. Grant, W. Union St., Hillsborough

Shope, Mr. and Mrs. J.M., Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Silver, Mrs. Sprague, Midway Plantation, Rt. 5, Raleigh

Sizemore, Mr. and Mrs. W.D., Rt. 7, Box 76, Durham

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. James C., II, 9911 Colony Rd., Fairfax, Va.

Snipes, Mr. and Mrs. J.L., 1005 Peachtree, Dunwoody Court, Atlanta, Ga.

Spurgeon, Miss Carrie M., 429 Guilford Circle, Raleigh

Spurgeon, Miss Mary, Hillsborough

Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. Durward T., Box 168, Graham

Street, Mr. and Mrs. Robert B., Rt. 1, Box 405, Huntersville

Strudwick, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund, Jr., 1800 Monument Ave., Richmond, Va.

Sugg, Dr. Eugene S., Rt. 1, Chapel Hill

Suitt, Mr. and Mrs. Volnar R., 307 Watts St., Durham

Suttenfield, Mr. William H., Queens Towers, 1300 Queens Road, Charlotte

Sweaney, Dr. and Mrs. Hunter, 1007 Vickers Ave., Durham

Swaeney, Miss Lois, 1002 Hill St., Durham

Tally, Mr. and Mrs. Arby C., 3501 Duke Homestead Rd., Durham

Teer, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Jr., Box 853, Hillsborough

Teer, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Sr., 145 E. King St., Hillsborough

Thompson, Miss Ella Graves, Leasburg

Tinnin, Mrs. George W., 1319 Ft. Bragg Rd., Fayetteville

Todd, Mr. John Hart, P.O. Box 23, 1985 Shrine Bldg., Memphis, Tenn.

Tolbert, Mr. Noble, Jr., Box 616, Chapel Hill

Totten, Mr. and Mrs. H. Roland, 110 Laurel Hill Rd., Chapel Hill

Trull, Miss Margaret L., Highlands, Hillsborough

Turner, Mrs. H.M., 304 S. Seventh St., Mebane

Turner, Dr. Herbert S., 315 N. Coalter St., Staunton, Virginia

Tyler, Mrs. E. Runyon, 1524 Hermitage Court, Durham

Umstead, Mrs. Irvin E., Rt. 2 Box 14, Durham

Wade, Rev. and Mrs. J.H., E. Union St., Hillsborough

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Donald, 123 W. Union St., Hillsborough

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G., Mebane

Wall, Miss Rebecca B., Heartsease, 115 E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Ward, Dr. Calvin L., 1726 Duke University Rd., Durham

Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Ira A., 1504 Michaux Rd., Chapel Hill

Warren, Dr. and Mrs. A.J., Ashbrook Farm, Chester Springs, Penn.

Wasden, Mrs. Charles N., 2486 Vineville Ave., Macon, Ga.

Weaver, Mrs. Hazel, 2723 Lullington Dr., Winston-Salem

Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. J.R., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough

Webb, Miss Annie R., Boylan Apts., C-103, Raleigh

Webb, Miss Isabelle, 117 E. Queen St., Hillsborough

Webb, Mrs. J.C., Hillsborough

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. John Graham, Hillsborough

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Beverly, 2126 Norton Rd., Charlotte

Webb, Miss Louise C., 101 Ingleside Dr., Concord

Webb, Mrs. Thomas H., 101 Ingleside Drive, Concord

Weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Mangum Weeks, 219 N. Royal St., Alexandria, Va.

Welborn, Mrs. Allen B., 717 Farris Ave., High Point

West, Mr. and Mrs. G.H., 1512 N. Duke St., Durham

White, Mr. and Mrs. W.H., 1809 Independence Road, Greensboro

Whitted, Mr. and Mrs. H.E., Jr., 3710 Kirklees Road, Winston-Salem

William, Mrs. Clem C., 3922 Ingomar St., Washington 15, D.C.

Williams, Mr. Paul Reid, Box 826, Hillsborough

Winecoff, Mr. and Mrs. K.C., Hillsborough

Witherspoon, Mr. Henry Kollock, 2630 Fairview Rd., Raleigh

Zener, Mrs. Karl E., 2727 Sparger Rd., Durham

JUNIOR MEMBERS (Age through High School)

Cole, Miss Cathy, Rt. 1, Hillsborough

Coman, Mr. James H. III, Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Coman, Mr. Robert F., Rt. 3, Hillsborough

Corn, Mr. Howard, Box 1012, Hillsborough

Forrest, Miss Josephine, Hillsborough

Riley, Mr. Bobbie, Box 145, Efland

Smith, Mr. Mark, 91-385, Papipi Rd., Ewa Beach, Hawaii

Smith, Mr. Peter, 91-385, Papipi Rd., Ewa Beach, Hawaii

Bivins, Mr. Robert, Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough

TOTAL MEMBERSHIP 497

 

DUES

Our fiscal year coincides with the calendar year. Your dies finance the News-Letter, our various leaflets, and the Society’s many projects.

 

We are most grateful to those members who already have paid their dues for 1968. If you are a new member who joined after July 1, 1967, you will not owe us further dues until January 1, 1969; all other members dues are payable by January 1, 1968.

 

For your convenience please fill out the form below, indicate the type of membership desired, detach it, and mail it with your check (payable to the Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.) to the Secretary, Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc., Box 871, Hillsborough, N.C., 27278.

 

Detach here:

Date

The Secretary

Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.

Box 871

Hillsborough, N.C., 27278

Dear Secretary:

Here are my dues ($_______________) for a ___________________________ membership in the Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc., for the year January 1, 1968 to January 1, 1969.

 

Annual Membership ($3 per year)

Family Membership ($5 per year)

(Husband and Wife)

Contributing Member ($10 per year)

Life Membership ($90 – to be paid within three years)

Junior Membership ($1 per year) – for members through 18 years of age.

 

Name ______________________

Address ______________________

______________________

Zip Code____________

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 32

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol.  VI, No.  32                                 July, 1967

The Hillsborough Historical Society is pleased to announce to the membership that it now owns real property. On May 7, 1967 at

 

An Historical Program

to

THE HUGHES ACADEMY

Established in 1845

by

Samuel Wellwood Hughes

Mattie Rose Tolar, great great grand-daughter, of the founder presented the deed to the property to the Society’s President, Mr. John M. Roberts.

 

The gift of this property was the result of the great interest and concentrated efforts of the Society’s member, Mrs. R.W. Isley, and the many direct descendants of Samuel Wellwood Hughes, who have contributed much time, effort and money to restore the school and to insure its preservation as a truly historical site. Mrs. Isley and Mrs. R. D. Hughes of New Bern were the Coordinating Committee. Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Tolar (Mr. Tolar being a grandson of the School’s founder) donated a plot of land approximately 100 X 100 ft. on which the old School stands.

 

By presenting the program material given at the dedication ceremony on May 7, 1967 we hope to share with all the Society’s members the history of the School’s founder and a bit of biography of some of its illustrious students.

 

Program

Presiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lieutenant Governor Robert Scott

Invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Clarke Porter III

Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Mr. Tom Ellis

Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Mr. Sam M. Hughes

Greetings from …

The Hillsborough Historical Commission … Judge L.J. Phipps

The Hillsborough Historical Society. . . . . . . . Dr. George Daniel

Recognition of Guests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. R.W. Isley

Introduction of Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Phillips Russell

Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Dr. R.B. House

Presentation of Highway Marker . . . . . . . . .             Mrs. Elizabeth Wilborn

Presentation of Deed to Property . . . . . . . . .            Mattie Rose Tolar

Presentation of all Properties to

The Historical Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Collier Cobb

Acceptance of Markers and Property . . . . .             Mr. John Roberts

Benediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Rev Clarke Porter III

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

SAMUEL WELLWOOD HUGHES

 

Third of the ten sons of Joseph Dunn Hughes who grew to manhood in this God-fearing, book-loving home, was Samuel Wellwood Hughes. His youth was spent in his father’s school. He entered the Bingham School, then taught in Hillsborough. After completing the course there and assisting Mr. Bingham for a year or two, he entered Hampton-Sydney College and worked his way through. On one occasion he walked home from College – a distance of 160 miles. Samuel Wellwood Hughes married Elizabeth Hughes of Prince Edward County, Virginia and went to live at his father’s old place on the Eno. In January 1845, he established at Cedar Grove a school called Cedar Grove Academy. This was primarily a boy’s preparatory school but a few girls attended from the community. It was advertised in state papers as a Classical and Mathematical School. Tuition was $25 and board $60 for the school year of ten months. The enrollment was about a 100. The main studies in the curriculum were English, Latin, Greek, and Mathematics, but the three R’s were never neglected. The afternoon sessions of the school were always opened with a Bible lesson in which every student was required to take part, thus providing spiritual knowledge and firm Presbyterian discipline. During the war between the states, this school was moved to his yard near the Eno Church and the name was changed to Hughes Academy. There it was successfully conducted until his death – 1884. During these years he taught the sons of most of his neighbors and kinsmen. Students came from other states including Texas. Many were those who attributed their success in life to his influence. Samuel W. Hughes loved his work and continued to teach until a second stroke laid him low near the close of the last term, May 1884. Even then it has been said, a class of young men stood around his bed to recite. In October a third stroke called him to his rest.

 

MEMORIAL TO SAMUEL WELLWOOD HUGHES

Written by Dr. Charles Phillips of the University of North Carolina

In the death of Mr. Hughes, our church and state lost a man whose example was a blessing to out country. For many years a distinguished teacher, his work is to be seen in every department of our social, political, and ecclesiastical life. His pupils were taught to love truth, to be patient in seeking it, and to be strong through the finding of it. As an Elder in Eno Church, his head, his hand and his purse were ever ready and active to promote whatever was praiseworthy. He welcomed to his hospitality ministers of righteousness and teachers of youth, and he stored his shelves with books on Science, Literature and Religion. Belonging to a family that feared God, he has left children likely to walk in his steps of Faith, Hop and Charity. He died in the house where he was born – respected, trusted, and honored by his neighbors. His father had preceded his in the Eldership of Eno Church. His first wife was a sister of Judge Robert W. Hughes of the United States Court of Virgina; his second wife, a sister of Sheriff Murray of Alamance County. He, himself, was a graduate of Hampden-Sydney College of Virginia. Such men, quiet, energetic, unobtrusive, firm for the right, just and true are the strength and hope of any country.

JOSEPH DUNN HUGHES

 

Among the old schools of Orange County was one taught by Joseph Dunn Hughes born 1775, and died 1844. He was the son of Timothy and came from Rowan County in the early 1800’s to the Eno Community at the request of the pastor, Rev. Samuel Paisley, to teach a school near the church. Seeing that his own children, and the families of his neighbors were in danger or growing up in ignorance, he gathered them together, and taught them the rudiments. He was known as “The Father of Schools in North Orange”. Following him for a hundred years or more, his descendants were teaching Orange. In his will, he allotted to each of his children an equal amount for his education.

 

CHILDREN OF JOSEPH DUNN HUGHES

  1. Andrew Green – Presbyterian minister
  2. Thomas Harvey – Sheriff of Orange County
  3. Samuel Wellwood – Educator
  4. Timothy Webb – Died at age 20
  5. Joseph Faddis – Died at age 25 – studying medicine
  6. James Franklin – a farmer
  7. William Paisley – Photographer
  8. William Rice – Physician
  9. John Henry – Merchant and Farmer
  10. Sidney Baxter – Killed in battle 1864
  11. Jane
  12. Eliza
  13. Margaret Anne
  14. Mary

Note: Harvey, Samuel, and Rice were Elders of Eno Church. John Henry was a Deacon.

 

NAMES OF SOME FORMER STUDENTS OF THE HUGHES ACADEMY

William Woods Allison

William Benjamin Alliston

Robert Anderson

Alex Anderson

Joel Anderson

Henry Anderson

Robert D. Bain

Martha Bain

Mary Lee Bain

Nathaniel Bain

Alex Clark

Needham Bryan Cobb

John Probert Cobb

Artemis A. Compton

Andrew Compton

D.I. Craig

J.L. Currio

W.T. Dortch

Thomas C. Ellis

George Faucett

Joe Faucett

Osborn Forrest

Joseph Hughes

Henry Hughes

 

Names of Some Former Students of the Hughes

 

Robert Hughes

Augustus Hughes

Floyd Hughes

John Knox Hughes

Jesse Hughes

 

Eugene Hughes

Agnes Hughes

Annie L. Hughes

Netta Hughes

Lizzie Hughes

Mary Hughes

Albert Hughes

Claude M. Hughes, M.D.

Willie Hendon

Mary Hendon

Irvin Hogan

Thomas Jordan, M.D.

Virginia Jordan

Charles W. Johnston

Jeanette Maris

James C. Maris

Corinna L. Maris

Robert W. Murray

Willie McDade

L.A. Phillips

Naza Vernon Ray

John Smith

Robert W. Scott

 

 

Academy – Continued

 

Daniel E. Wilkinson

Charles C. Wilkinson

George Winston

P.H. Winston

Spier Whitaker

 

Many more attended the school whose records could not be found.

 

NEEDHAM BRYAN COBB

Son of William Donnell Cobb and Ann Spicer Collier; educated at Hughes Academy and University of North Carolina; received first earned master’s degree granted by University of North Carolina and practiced law; because a Baptist preacher; State Supt. Of Baptist Sunday School Board; Recording Secretary; President Baptist State Convention; Chaplain in Lee’s Army; published first paper in Raleigh after war, “The Daily Record,” and wrote poetry. Married Martha Louise Cobb, a relative – of this marriage 3 children were born. (Mr. Cobb was the grandfather of Miss Mary Cobb and Mr. Collier Cobb, Society members from Chapel Hill.)

 

DR. D.I. CRAIG

Born in Orange County, North Carolina; son of James Newton Craig and Mary Emalina Strayhorn; educated at Hughes Academy, Davidson College and Columbia Theological Seminary; Stated Clerk of North Carolina Presbyterian Synod for a number of years.

 

JAMES LAUCHLIN CURRIE

Attended Hughes Academy, Hampden-Sydney College, Union Theological Seminary; A Presbyterian Minister serving churches of Fairfield, Eno, Little River, Chapel Hill, New Hope, Griers, Stony Creek, Hillsborough and Burlington. Married Violet Womach of Prince Edward County, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS DORTCH

Born in Nash County in 1824, the son of William Dortch and Drusilla Dortch; attended Hughes Academy and the William J. Bingham School in Hillsborough; studied law under Bartholomew F. Moore at Nashville, N.C.; admitted to bar at January Term, 1845; received Superior Court license in 1846. In 1848 he moved to Goldsboro in Wayne County; acknowledged leader of the bar in Wayne, Lenoir, Greene, Johnston, Nash, Edgecombe and Wilson Counties. Declined judge-ship in 1859; House of Commons 1852, 1858 and 1869; Speaker in 1860; Senator in w861; after war served in State Legislature. Died in 1889 in Goldsboro.

 

DR. THOMAS MURPHY JORDAN

Attended Hughes Academy, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College. He practiced medicine in Orange and Greene Counties. During Governor Kitchin’s tenure of office he was physician in charge at the Penitentiary. Dr. Jordan went with the State Board of Health in 1914, and worked at the State Hospital at Raleigh, where he was in charge of the three Epileptic Colonies.

 

ANNIE L. HUGHES

Daughter of Samuel Hughes. Attended Hughes Academy, Concord Female College and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Was an outstanding teacher in Reidsville, N.C. and Orange County for 60 years.

 

REV. A.L. PHILLIPS

Born in Chapel Hill; Attended Hughes Academy and graduated from the University of North Carolina; son of a Presbyterian minister, Dr. Charles Phillips; grandson of Dr. James Phillips, Presbyterian minister and professor; Home Missionary in eastern North Carolina; General Supt. Of Sunday School Work and Young Peoples Work. (Rev. Phillips was the great uncle of Mr.. Phillips Russell.)

 

NAZA VERNON RAY

Letter from Samuel W. Hughes dated November 23, 1873 citing qualifications for Naza Vernon Ray to enter college. He had taken full courses in preparation for this; Math, English, Latin, Greek, Psychology and Astronomy. First receipt dated August 25, 1872 for $10.00 to enter Hughes Academy. After leaving Hughes Academy, attended University of North Carolina – studied there for several summers; then to Greensboro where he taught school for fourteen years.

 

ROBERT WALTER SCOTT

An agricultural leader – was educated at Hughes Academy, Bingham School, and the University of North Carolina; member House of Commons 1889-91; State Senator 1901-29; married Lizzie Hughes, daughter of Samuel Wellwood Hughes; had fourteen children – among them, Gov. Kerr Scott and State Senator Ralph Scott; a grandson is Lt. Gov. Bob Scott. Appointed to Board of Argiculture in 1901; was a Trustee of State College.

 

GEORGE WINSTON: “WINDSOR CASTLE”

Second President of the University of North Carolina after it reopened in 1875. Also President of State College and University.

 

SPIER WHITAKER

Born in Halifax County; Educated at Hughes Academy and the Universtiy of North Carolina; Served as a soldier in War between the States; promoted to Adjutant General; Judge of  Superior Court; Chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee; State Senator; married Miss Fanny DeBerniere Hooper of Hillsborough.

 

DR. CLAUDE HUGHES

Son of Samuel Wellwood Hughes, was a greatly beloved “country doctor” in Cedar Grove for many years.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The following advertisement is taken from the Hillsborough Recorder of December 15, 1855.

CEDAR GROVE ACADEMY

The next session of this institution will commence on the 7th of January next. The Academy is situated eight miles north of Hillsborough.

Terms:

Tuition in Latin, Greek, etc.                                       $20.00

English                                                           12.50

 

Board, including washing, room, furniture, etc., convenient to the Academy, per session of twenty-one weeks                                                       $40.00

S.W. Hughes

S.M. Wells

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

About 1875 the school was advertised as follows:

HUGHES ACADEMY

CLASSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCHOOL

Cedar Grove Orange County

Has been in successful operation for 30 years under its present Principal.

THIS SCHOOL

Is located in a pleasant and healthy neighborhood, six miles north of Hillsborough.

THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR

Is divided into two sessions, commencing on the Second Monday of January; and the second Monday of July.

 

CHURCHES

Of different denominations are situated near the school, and the pupils are required to attend Church regularly on the Sabbath.

 

EXPENSES

Board, including all necessary expenses except lights, washing and towels $60.00

Tuition                                                                                                                     25.00

 

Pupils charged from the time of entrance, if more than two weeks is lost at the commencement of the Session. NO deduction is promised afterward, except in cases of protracted illness.

SAMUEL W. HUGHES

Cedar Grove, N.C.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

We urge all members and friends to visit the Hughes Academy. Take Highway 86N. from Hillsborough to the Highway Marker, 6 miles, turn left 1 mile and on your right is the Hughes Academy. It is a charming, quiet sylvan area. Nearby are the remains of a building which housed the Academy’s kitchen. It has deteriorated beyond repair. Not far away may be seen the crumbling ruins of the Hughes residence. In front of the old school building is the handsome Memorial Plaque atop a native stone marker which was unveiled and dedicated at the ceremony of May 7th.

 

SITE OF THE HUGHES ACADEMY

Established 1845:

SAMUEL WELLWOOD HUGHES

MASTER TEACHER

 

 

Mrs. Robert D. Isely, Mr. Marion M. Clark, and Miss Elizabeth H. Collins have been appointed the Property Committee as provided by the Society’s by-laws. It will be their responsibility to insure proper maintenance of this valuable asset.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

MEMBERSHIP: Now 464.

NEW MEMBERS:       Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P. Miller – Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Britton Sawyer – Hillsborough

Dr. and Mrs. Irvin Brody – Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rasberry – Hillsborough

Mr. and Mrs. Bonner Sawyer – Hillsborough

Mrs. Robert D. Hughes – Cedar Grove, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Braxton, Jr. – Graham, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Harrington – Graham, N.C.

Mrs. W.D. MacMillan – Wilmington, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. B.S. Hastings – Decatur, Georgia

Mrs. Martha G. Robinson, Raleigh, N.C.

 

DECEASED: Mrs. E.M. Lockhart, Membership Chairman, notes with regret our loss by death of these two valuable members.

Mrs. Robert B. Street – Huntersville, N.C.

Miss Freda Webb – Raleigh, N.C.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

AT THE MUSEUM:

CORRECTION: The interesting exhibit showing raw cotton and the steps to the finished cloth as reported in the last News-Letter was arranged by Mr. R.B. Cooke of Irwin Mills, Durham.

NEW ACQUISITIONS, Currently displayed:

Tea Pot and Trivett, and a  Cup and Saucer, formerly the property of Mary Burwell Strudwick, daughter of the founders of Burwell School. Donated to the Historic Hillsborough Commission by her grand-daugher, Mary Strudwick Berry, and on loan to the Museum by the Commission.

Hand Cradle, used for reaping grain, -rye, wheat. Loaned by Paul H. Rasberry, Hillsborough.

Shoe maker’s last, Loaned by Mrs. Frank Perry, Hillsborough.

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 31

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

Vol.  VI, No.  31                        April, 1967

PLAN TO BE IN HILLSBOROUGH APRIL 22 and 23, 1967

For the

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S

T H I R D    B I E N N I A L    S P R I N G    T O U R

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TIME – Saturday, April 22, 1967 – 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

Sunday, April 23, 1967 – 1:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M.

 

HEADQUARTERS:                  – THE OLD COURTHOUSE on Court Square

 

TICKETS – Adults – $2.50

Children (through High school) – $1.00

 

THE PLANNING COMMITTEE

General Chairmen     – Mrs. H.W. Moore

Mrs. Erle G. Hill

 

Registration               – Mrs. E.M. Lockhart

Mrs. Elmer Dowdy

 

Hostesses                   – Mrs. John Graham Webb

 

Craft House                – Mrs. Joe Hughes

Mrs. Scott Cates

 

Antiques                     – Mrs. James H. Coman

Miss Elizabeth H. Collins

 

Museum                     – Mrs. Clarence D. Jones

 

Sales Items and Square Dancing – Dalton H. Loftin

 

Floral Arrangements – Mrs. Fred Cates, Jr.

 

Window Displays – Quentin Patterson

 

Programs and Posters – Edwin Hamlin

 

Food Concessions      – Mrs. Quentin Patterson

 

Girl Scout Dances      – Mrs. Vance Isenhour

Mrs. Madison Cates

 

Parking                       – Remus Smith, Jr.

 

Guides                        – Dr. H.W. Moore

 

Slides Program          – Dr. Charles H. Blake

 

Tickets                        – E. Wilson Cole

 

Publicity                     – Mrs. Edwin Hamlin

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

HOUSES AND GARDENS TO BE VISITED

 

SEVEN HEARTHS, 157 East King Street, residence of Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Murphy. This is the home as described by Mrs. Murphy (Kitty).

 

T’was not a case of “love at first site.” Second and third “sight” still didn’t promote any great admiration or affection. There was, rather, a slow case of evolution – a gradual osmosis of fondness for an old, almost tumbledown house that led to purchase of “Seven Hearths,” known then as the Hayes-Taylor House.

 

When we first looked at the property, the writer, Peter Taylor, was the owner. It had been rented for several years, and through neglect and age had been allowed to lean and sag, weather and deteriorate the way old frame structures will do, particularly in the warm, humid South. We were in desperate need of a house, and I am sure that the extreme necessity of seeking shelter moved us in, sans furnace, with inadequate plumbing, and with electricity that was nonexistent if someone ironed while someone cooked. The floors swayed like hammocks when walked upon, and bats frequently came down the wide-open chimneys, perhaps in search of insects that found no window or door screens to keep them outside. A thick mantle of ivy had pushed its way into the attics under the loose clapboards where it grew rampantly, and the winter wind found those same openings through which to whistle uninhibited. It was a rough and rugged year.

 

When our lease was up, Mr. Taylor told us that he wanted to spend several years in Europe, and could do so only if he put the property up for sale. As strange as it may seem, in the face of the foregoing unpleasantries, no great persuasion was necessary to have us buy the house. We had scrubbed the windows to the sun and let in a rainbow n the wavy prisms of leaded panes. We had crawled “over and under and in between” and had marveled at the massive supporting beams of oak, most of them 12 and 14 inches square, hand-hewn and grey with age. Fresh paint had been applied to he dingy walls and the rooms had come alive with color. We had scrubbed down the woodwork and mantels, chair rails, wainscot, and six-panel doors, and had found their pegs and their carving that gave evidence that here was the work of craftsmen possessing great skill and artistry. We dug up brick, larger, rougher, and darker than any we had seen before, and found on them handprints of their makers. Hard labor had unearthed the remnants of early plantings – roses and bulb beds – held fast in the clutches of Johnson grass and honeysuckle. The start had been small, but rewarding, and we were intrigued by what we had found.

 

We knew the house was old – just how old we were not sure. Miss Sue Hayes was born in it, and she told us that when her mother, Susan B. Hayes, bought it in 1876, that it was thought to be well over a hundred years old. Then Hillsborough was fortunate in having the Alfred Engstroms move here a few years ago, and Mrs. Engstrom, with her vast knowledge of research and her great perserverance in putting that knowledge to work, got at the Colonial Records – the deeds, the wills, court minutes, etc., and we were able to find the facts that supported our belief that our house might be, in its main block, approaching close to its 200th birthday.

 

There are various references in early COURT MINUTES to William Reed’s dwelling house “near the Court House.” Reed and his wife, Elizabeth Douglas, were living in Orange County in December, 1752, when he was appointed deputy to William Churton, and in 1753 deputy clerk of the Court. In the COURT MINUTES Reed petitions for a license to keep an Ordinary or Tavern at his  house on Lot 30. The dwelling house being located on “The GREATER KING STREET,” the Road to Halifax, and the old Indian Trading Path, was well-placed to be used as a tavern. DB No. 1 reveals that on Sept. 8, 1755, William Churton sells to William Reed, Tavernkeeper, “Two certain Lotts of Land (No. 30 and No. 40) in Corbinton on the north side of the great Street commonly called King Street, and a Lott (No. 29) on the West for the sum of 15 shillings for each Lott.” (Included in the deed is a provision for building within two years.)

 

C.J. Sauthior drew his map of Hillsborough in October, 1768, and on it, on lot 30 there is a dwelling house where the present house stands. There were two outbuildings behind the main house, and a garden to the East, where oral tradition says it stood within living memory. There seens to be a structure to the stream call the Still-house Branch running through the Western edge of lot 30. Very likely this was an early still-house to supply William Reed’s Tavern.

 

Barnaby Cabe was the next owner of the property. No deed has been found for this exchance of lot 30, but it is believed that Wm. Reed, the younger (there were 5 William Reeds!) sold to Barnaby Cabe after Reed’s father’s death in 1764.

 

Then we have one of those confusing and frustrating records appearing. DB No. 2, page 57-58 states that on Jan. 7, 1777, Barnaby Cabe sold the two lots, 30 and 40 to William Courthney, the prominent Quaker, for 80 pounds sterling. DB No. 8, page 151-152 states that Barnaby Cabe sold the two lots to William Courtney, the Quaker, in Jan., 177-. Unless additional record are found some day, I guess we will just never know which of the two dates if the correct one. One important fact is outstanding, however. This same lot had brought only 15 shillings a short time before, now brings 80 pounds sterling. We can surmise that not only was the Tavern built, but it must have been going at a good rate! I have always hoped that Courtney owned my house from 1770 rather than from 1777. Barnaby Cabe was a bit of a skally-wag. Not only did he supply the King’s troops with needed supplies, being a wagoner for the same, but he has left a “padded expense account” for all posterity to read. He lists his supplies in Colonial Records, and often we find that if he carried the British 15 pairs of shoes, he also adds, “one for self.” If he carries 6 barrels of rum to Troops, he inevitably has “one for self!”

 

On Jan. 7, 1790, (which I shall, by reason of choice, call TWENTY years later) William Courtney deeded his property to his grandson, Josiah Watts, Jr. This deed bears out the 1770 date found in DB No. 8, as it states in part,  “For the natural love and affection which he hath and beareth unto Josiah Watts, his grandson… the said Lotts… purchased of Barnaby Cabe, 7, January, 1770… with Houses, and all outhouses, etc.”

 

It is sad to note here that Josiah Watts, Jr. must have died at an early age. No deed or will has been found, but the Will of Josiah Watts, Sr., dated July 6, 1798 leaves the estate to his brother, Thomas Watts.

 

It is in June, 1799, that Lott 30, the Still-House Lott, adds another record to its “boozey” name in the early annals of Hillsborough history. DB No. 9, refers to an indenture made by Thomas Watts of Orange County and Africa Parker, a free man of the town (formerly owned by the Quaker, Wm. Courtney) arranging between them a “copartnership and Joint trade in the Art, mystery and business of a Distiller” for 12 years. Thomas Watts “did bargain, will let and lease to Africa Parker” the western half of lot 30 and the western half of lot 40 (the area of the Still-House Branch). Africa Parker could write his own name, always spelling out “free man” after it, but he had to go into debt to Cain, Ray and Company for the equipment to make his still function. He deeds in trust, to these people, his interest in the western half of the lots in return for three separate debts he had to incur. The still-house on lot 30, the two stills now standing and fixed in the still-house, “the stands, tubs, potts, and other utensils and implements.” DB No. 16, p. 340 shows that Thomas Watts, Africa Parker’s partner, paid the three separate debts owed, and redeemed the western halves of  lots 30 and 40 one year later.

 

Various members of the Watts family owned lot 30 until 1834 when it was sold, for the sum of $1600.00 to Col. Stephen Moore. Note that the Watts family had owned the property for 44 years. In all probability, Thomas D. Watts, a very prominent and wealthy man, built the west wing of the house.

 

Stephen Moore lived here for only 8 years. He became heavily involved in numerous debts, and this property, along with his vast holdings in other places had to be sold to satisfy his debtors.

The house changed hands many times and knew many owners from 1842 until it was bought on Dec. 5, 1877, by Susan B. Hayes, wife of William A. Hayes for the sum of $800.00. Mrs. Hayes added the Northeast portion of the house, removing the side of one of the smaller outhouses, probably a “summer kitchen” and building over the brick open area-way to join the two buildings together. The three additions to the house are easily discernable, and no one chose to build “their” level the same as any other builder. In all, there are 5 different levels – so if “split-level” is an innovation, it is in the term only. It was in “operation here in Hillsborough before the Revolutionary War!

 

The restoration of the house has taken 13 years. It has cost thousands of dollars, study, help from many sources, some pillage and plunder from ruinous houses of the same era to obtain wood, glass and brick, when we found too great deterioration of that which was here. Many Victorian features had to be stripped away, but since they were added over an earlier structure, they presented no great problem. All in all, this old house contains most of its own original building material. We have for reasons obvious, but in two baths. We no longer draw water from the well, and we have furnace heat in the winter and wir-conditioning in the summer. The electricity works even if there is ironing and cooking at the same time. We have become expert in brick-laying, painting, and restoring old wood. Some one asked me not long ago if we “didn’t have a ghost”. I was sorry to reply that we did not. A friend who was standing near-by remarked, “She’s done so much of everything else to this old house that I am sure she’s planning to come back and haunt it herself.” So perhaps I shall. I shall first confer with the shade of William Reed, tavernkeeper; I shall ask C.J. Saunter some questions about the appearance of things long gone that appeared on his map of Hillsborough in 1768; perhaps I won’t be able to find that double-dealing Barnaby Cabe, but the Quaker will be there to set me straight about Deed Book 8; Africa will be there – a really “free” man, as will Stephen Moore, who dispite his losses and burden of debts, had the great feeling to write in his indenture of 1842, where his horses were to go, giving certain loved personal belongings to certain friends, and writing of his slaves, including “Dicey, who is not to be separated from her children.”

 

In the meantime, do come to see our old house on Tour in April. It is neiter famous nor historically great, but you may find it interesting, and we love to share it with those who do.

 

WEBB-MATHESON OLD BRICK KITCHEN, end of East Tryon Street.

Brick kitchen and East part of house probably built about 1797.

 

Earliest deed dated 1797 from James Hogg, ancestor of present owners, to James Phillips. Property came back into family in 1854 when bought by Thomas Blount Hill of Halifax, and has remained in the family since that time.

 

Kitchen originally had a partition, making two rooms downstairs – kitchen with big fire place and Dutch oven and the cook’s room with smaller fireplace. There are two rooms upstairs.

 

Some old kitchen utensils remain in view – waffle iron, skimmers and ladle on wall, on the table in the corner a sifter, a beater for whipped cream, a pudding mold, cake pans, coffee mill, molds for cottage cheese and jellies, a nutmeg grater, cherry seeder, and raisin grinder. The large pewter covers on the safe were used over the food when it was carried across the yard to the dining room in the house. The old iron pieces on the hearth, the brass kettles, and the jugs add to the collection used many years ago.

 

The iron chest between the two doors was used in the first Bank of Hillsborough, which was a branch of the bank of the Cape Fear in Wilmington. The agent for this bank was Dr. James Webb. The ledger shows the accounts of many prominent citizens of this section dating from 1815-1828 – Archibald Murhphey, Elisha Mitchell, Josiah Turner, William Cain, Gov. Burke’s daughter, Mary, Duncan Cameron, Dennis Heartt, Thomas Ruffin, Thomas Webb.

 

The brick wall of the Pool Garden was builr in 1954 and the pool added a year later.

 

BURNSIDE – Entrance at end of East Margaret Lane. Mrs. Robert M. Browning and her daughter, Mrs. Mary B. Nelson are residing here and have made it passible for Tour visitors to see this famous old home. Miss Rebecca Bonnehan Wall, the present owner, recently has restored the old basement dining room and is opening it for the Tour. Miss Wall and Miss Annie Cameron have given us this interesting history of BURNSIDE.

 

The direct sequence of the ownership of “Burnside” starts with an order from the Earl of Granville, in the year 1754, that William Churton, at one time Surveyor General for the Carolinas, survey 653 acres of land to be assigned as a town to be named “Orange” in honor of William of Orange.

 

This 253 acres not included in the town of Orange lay east and immediately adjoining the town limits. These town limits, wntil very recently, remained as laid out by William Churton, as do most of the streets bearing the names selected by him. “Burnside” proper, forms a portion of this 253 acres.

 

“Burnside” received its Scottish name from its fifth owner Paul Carrington Cameron, because it lay along a stream or “burn.” It was while he was owner of “Burnside” that the magnificent “coniferous” trees of many varieties were planted as well as several trees of each variety native to the State. These plantings were done under the direction of a landscape gardener from England. Some of these beautiful trees are still in their prime.

 

The great oaks standing in the grounds were, according to authorities, well developed trees on that March day in the year of 1663 when King Charles the 2nd made his gracious gift of land to eight of his favored supporters, later known as the Lords Proprietors of Carolina.

 

“Burnside” has through the years been a silent witness of much of the history of early North Carolina. Passing a few yards north of its ancient oaks ran the Great Catawba Path, a highway for the Indians passing from eastern Virginia and Carolina to the Catawba Indian country which lay along the river that now bears their name. Many years later this path became “The Great Oxford Road.”

 

In passing through the present site of Hillsborough, those red-skinned travelers made their way through “Occoneechee Town” named for the tribe of Occoneechee Indians. Lawson, the first Carolina Historian, reports this a large village at the time of his visit in 1701.

 

The lowlands at “Burnside” have yielded up many Indian relics as well as funeral trappings of these bygone owners, and are still a fertile source of Indian arrowheads.

 

Again in the year 1771 “Burnside’s” giant oaks stood as silent observers of the execution of certain of the Regulators hanged by order of the Court of the Royal Province of North Carolina on June 19 of that year. The names of only four of the six men executed are known. Merrill and Messer were Captains of companies in the forces of the Regulators. Pugh, a gun-smith from Hillsborough showed exceptional bravery in the “Battle of Alamance.” Little is known of Matter. These names appear on the tablet placed by the Colonial Dames to mark the site of execution which was on the Burnside property.

 

“Burnside”, since Indian times has had ten owners as follows –

William Few, Sr.         1758               Paul Cameron                        1854

William Few, Jr.          1772               Paul Cameron Graham         1907

James Hogg                1777               Bennehan Cameron              1907

Cullen Pollock            1794               Annie Cameron Collins Wall            1912

– Rebecca Bennehan Wall

 

BURWELL SCHOOL – 319 North Churton Street. Please refer to NEWS-LETTER No. 25 for the complete story of this famous school. It is now the property of the Historic Hillsborough Commission and is a restoration project. By courtesy of the Commission the property will be opened for the Tour. Visitors will see restoration in progress. Members of the Commission and residents of Hillsborough will act as hosts and hostesses (in Colonial costumes) and will be available to answer visitor’s questions.

 

JOHN GRAHAM WEBB BOXWOOD GARDEN – 117 East Queen Street. This charming little garden at the rear of the 193 year old Webb home, often called Miss Polly Burke’s School for first usade, has many old plants – roses, iris, japonica, anemone, forsythia, clematis, blue hyacinth, Persian lilac, and lily-of-the-valley. Boxwood and other plants and shrubs have been added since 1932 by the present owner.

 

THE NASH LAW OFFICE – 143 West Margaret Lane. This property was purchased in July 1966 by Judge L.J. Phipps, Chairman of the Historic Hillsborough Commission, for possible purchase and restoration by the Commission. This is  one of the two best surviving examples of Old Hillsborough law offices. (The other: Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin’s Law Office at Burnside.)

The earliest date if uncertain. May be in 1770’s. Tradition says a royal governor used it temporarily. Known to have been on Lot #10 when sold by Duncan Cameron in 1805 to Chief Justice Frederick Nash. May have been built by earlier owner, Francis Nash. Main Nash home stood where Farmers’ Exchange stands today.

 

After Chief Justice Nash’s death in 1857, his daughter, Misses Sally K. and Maria Nash, with their cousin, Sara Kollock, began the famous Nash and Kollock School for Young Ladies. Law Office was used as music studio; two rooms to west added as Sara Kollock’s living quarters but also used as piano practice rooms.

 

LADIES IN THE MAKING, a delightful book by Ann S. Nash, tells how the Law Office and its extension was used by the Nash and Kollock School for nearly 30 years. This is the only structure remaining from the famous Nash and Kollock School.

 

The most recent owner, Mrs. T.E. Lloyd, created the beautiful garden in the rear.

 

CHATWOOD – the home of Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Blake – 0.8 mile west on Hwy. 70; right 2 miles on Faucette Mill Road. Mrs. Blake describes Chatwood.

 

The Coach House was built about 1790, probably by Robert Faucette. It stands high ground above the ford of the Eno, near the Faucette Mill. It accommodated travelers on the King’s Highway, the road to Greensboro.

 

There are two entrances, on to the inn-parlor, the other to the owner’s quarters. All the walls and floors are of the original wide pine boards. The inn-parlor, now the living-room, connects with the former kitchen which has become the “back bedroom”. The old bar has been converted into a modern kitchen. The owner’s quarters have become the dining-room. Traces of the original gray-green paint may still be seen on the walls.

 

The frame of the wing is from the Naille Johnson house, formerly on the St. Mary’s area. It also dates from 1790. The frames of both parts of the house are oak timbers all numbered and put together with pins. The first floor of the wing has become the weaving studio, a much enjoyed room, which looks out over the original Faucette acres of fields and woodlands, bordered by the Eno.

 

An herb garden, a sanctuary garden of old roses, and a shrubbery, planted for the many birds that winter here may be enjoyed by visitors. The small greenhouse and heated pit are filled with a collection of geraniums, principally the old-fashioned and scented-leaved varieties, which do very well in the garden in summer, and have much charm.

 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

 

OLD ORANGE COUNTY COURT HOUSE – 1844

 

ORANGE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM – est. 1957

Second floor of the Old Orange County Court House

 

METHODIST CHURCH – 1859

 

BAPTIST CHURCH – 1860-1870

 

MASONIC HALL – 1823

 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH – 1757

This past winter your Projects Committee, assisted by Mr. Alexander Shepherd, planted hundreds of spring bulbs in the Cemetery. These bulbs were given by Mrs. Alfred Engstrom from the garden of Hooper House. Hopefully, blooms will be enjoyed by Tour visitors.

ST. MATTHEWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH AND CHURCH YARD – 1824

 

Hosts and hostesses in colorful Colonial costumes will be in the homes and public buildings to explain and to answer questions.

 

SPECIAL EVENTS AND FEATURES

 

DOWNTOWN WINDOW DIPLAYS – throughout Tour

 

CRAFT HOUSE – OLD NASH LAW OFFICE , 143 West Margaret Lane. Crafts of the colonial period, with native craftsman at work. (Making lye soap, quilting, caning, ceramics, and many others,) Throughout the Tour.

 

ANTIQUES SHOW AND SALE – BURWELL SCHOOL, 319 North Churton Street.

Beautiful antique china, crystal, silver and furniture will be displayed and for sale by:

Mollie Boren, Antiques – Greensboro, N.C.

Whitehall – Chapel Hill

County Squire, Antiques – Durham – Chapel Hill Blvd.

Flying Eagle – Durham – Chapel Hill Blvd.

In addition, Mrs. George B. Daniel, Jr. will arrange a display of Orange County antique furniture. Many of our members and friends will recognize some of these pieces. They were shown by Mrs. Daniel in her fine slide program on “Old Orange County Furniture”, presented at the Society’s Annual Meeting in October, 1964.

 

SLIDES PROGRAM – films and narrative of Hillsborough houses. (Approximately 30 minutes.) Saturday, 11 A.M., 1 P.M., and 3 P.M. Sunday, 2:30 and 3:30 P.M. Strudwick Hall at the Presbyterian Church.

 

COLONIAL CHILDREN’S DANCES – Local Girl Scouts – Old Court House Lawn – Saturday, 10:30 A.M. – Sunday, 1 P.M.

BAND CONCERTS – South Lawn of Old Court House – Saturday, 3 P.M. – Sunday, 2 P.M.

 

SQUARE DANCE DEMONSTRATION – Saturday, 12 Noon until 1 P.M. – South of Old Court House on Margaret Lane.

 

FOOD – The Orange Grove Grange at two locations, the Burwell School and the Parking area, East of the Old Court House, will provide box lunches (chicken with appropriate accompaniments), delicious country ham biscuits, coffee and soft drinks.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

NEW MEMBERS

Miss Lois Sweaney, Durham, N.C.

Mrs. A. Leroy Caldwell, Durham, N.C.

Mr. Everette Rosemond, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Mrs. James Webb Rogers, Sr., Landover, Maryland

Mr. Joseph Shepperd Rogers, Landover, Maryland

Mr. and Mrs. H. Walton Moore, Jr., Charlotte, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. John Couch, Hillsborough, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Cheshire, Hillsborough, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Young Smith, Jr., Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Mrs. E.M. Lockhart, Membership Chairman reports current membership is 505. 500th member, Mr. H. Walton Moore, Jr.

 

Mr. Lockhart announces the loss of two members because of death:

The Rev. Mr. Roland C. Stubbins, Efland, N.C.

Mr. Edwin A. Clare, Durham, N.C.

 

AT THE MUSEUM

The major project of the year is a brochure of the Murals. This is being prepared by the author, Le Gette Blythe, and the artist, Kenneth Whitsett. The Museum Committee hopes to have it ready for the Spring Tour.

 

Mr. Joe Hughes, representing Cone Mills, has set up an interesting exhibit showing the raw cotton and the different steps to the finished cloth.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Woods have given 14 old books, some dating back to 1838. A few are from the Nash and Kollock School and the Burwell School. For the present they have been placed in the drawer of the old desk from the Nash-Kollock School given by Mrs. Mary Exuum Shepherd.

 

Mrs. Charles H. Blake is in the process of rethreading the 150-year-old loom. She will demonstrate weaving here during the Tour.

 

Relatives of the late Mrs. Thelma Rosemond Johnston, a charter Member of the Museum Board, have started a Memorial Fund in her honor. Board members and friends have contributed to this Fund. Additional contributions honoring Mrs. Johnston will be most welcome.

 

The Orange County Ministerial Association met at the Museum on February 6, 1967. This program, arranged by the Rev. Mr. J.F. Minnis, member of the Museum Board, was to see the Murals. Dr. Charles H. Blake ran a tape recording of comments by the artist, Mr. Whitsett.

 

On Sunday, April 2, 1967, Mr. Edwin Lynch, Keeper of the Historic Weights and Measures, made his annual inspection. The new and old were brought together this year. Mr. Marion L. Kinlow, Supervisor of the Dept. of Weights and Measures of the N.C. State Dept. of Agriculture, Raleigh gave the principal talk.

 

Correction from the January NEWS-LETTER: The copy of the deed signed by Nathanial Rochester and the Copy of the deed signed by William Churton were given by Mr. and Mrs. James Webb, Greensboro, N.C.

 

PROGRAM CHAIRMEN – The Horticulture Committee offers to interested groups three slide programs with commentary:

“Some Gardens of Old Hillsborough”

“Old Roses of Hillsborough”

“Herbs for Flavor, Fragrance and Physic”

 

Rental $5.50 each, plus return postage.

Personally presented programs, $10.00.

Please write to Mrs. Charles H. Blake, Box 613, Hillsborough, N.C. 27278

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 30

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

NEWS-LETTER NO.30

Vol.  VI, No.  30                                January, 1967

OUR FEBRUARY PROGRAM

********************

THE HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

will present

DR. C. RICHARD SANDERS

Professor of English, Duke University

who will talk on

“The Bennehan and Cameron Families”

 

Friday evening, February 10, 1967, at 8 P.M., in the New Court House, Hillsborough, North Carolina. The program is open to the public. We hope all Society members will bring guests.

 

******************

Mark your calendars now – for April 22 and 23, 1967 – for

“HISTORIC HILLSBOROUGH’S COLONIAL WEEKEND”

 

Visit old homes, see restoration in progress, slide programs, arts and crafts exhibits, and much more – your Society’s biannual Spring Weekend.

 

******************

 

Our Officers for 1967                       President – Mr. John Mason Roberts

Vice President – Dr. George B. Daniel, Jr.

Secretary – Miss Margaret Trull

Treasurer – Miss Elizabeth H. Collins

 

Advisory Board                                  Mrs. John Graham Webb

Mrs. James H. Coman

Mrs. Marion B. Roberts

Dr. Charles H. Blake

Mr. Hugh Conway Browning

 

Committee Chairman                       Projects – Mrs. H.W. Moore

Mrs. Erle G. Hill, Co. Chm.

Publicity – Mrs. Edwin Hamlin

Publications – Mrs. David C. Rhew

Horticulture – Mrs. Charles H. Blake

Membership – Mrs. E.M. Lockhart

News-Letter – Mrs. William Hopewell

Museum – Liaison – Mrs. Clarence D. Jones

Program – Dr. George B. Daniel, Jr.

Mr. Grady Brown, Co. Chm

 

It is with deep regret that we announce that Mrs. Alfred G. Engstron, who has written the interesting and informative NEWS-LETTER for the past several years is unable to continue. Nor can Mrs. Louise R. Clayton continue as Publications Chairman. The Executive Committee wishes to express its great appreciation to these two women who have labored long and hard for the Society.

Four regular NEWS-LETTERS, to be published on a quarterly basis, are planned for 1967. These will be limited to for mimeographed sheets. In this was the membership will be kept informed of projects, begun and completed, programs, new members, and current activities of the Orange County Historical Museum. It is hoped that each issue will offer a “feature story” on a Hillsborough name, place or event. Should time of a special event warrant, an “extra” may be published. Suggestions for copy from the membership will be most welcome.

 

MEMBERSHIP: Now 494 (as of January 15, 1967)

New Annual Members:

Mr. and Mrs. M.M. Clark )

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Reese Martin )

Mr. Franz Roberts )

Mr. Curtis Scott )

Mr. Alex Shepard )

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Teer, Jr. ) Hillsborough, North Carolina

Mr. John M. Currie, Carthage , North Carolina

Mrs. Mary M. Dwelle , Charlotte, North Carolina

Mr. Leo Gardner, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Mr. R.M. Jervis, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Miss Nellie G. Lloyd, Durham, North Carolina

Mr. Allen Pettigrew, Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. and Mrs. Marshall Ruffin, Washington, D.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Brown Ruffin, Wilmington, North Carolina

Mrs. Sprague Silver, Raleigh, North Carolina

Mrs. Hazel Weaver, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. G.H. West, Durham, North Carolina

New Student Members:

Miss Cathy Cole )

Mr. James H. Coman, III )

Mr. Robert F. Coman )

Mr. Howard Corn, ) Hillsborough, North Carolina

Mr. Joe Hughes, Jr., Davidson, North Carolina

Mr. Mark Smith, Hawaii

Mr. Peter Smith, Hawaii

Deaths: Membership Chairman, Mrs. E.M. Lockhart, regrets the loss by death of our valued members:

Mr. Ben G. Johnston )

Mrs. Ben G. Johnston ) Hillsborough, North Carolina

Dr. Raymond S. Crispell, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

NEED A PROGRAM? The Horticulture Committee offers to interested groups three slide programs with commentary:

“Some Gardens of Old Hillsborough”

“Old Roses of Hillsborough”

“Herbs for Flavor, Fragrance and Physic”

Rental $5.50 each, plus return postage

Personally presented programs, $10.00

Please write to Mrs. Charles H. Blake, Box 613, Hillsborough, N.C. 27278

 

Monies earned by these programs are used to finance the work of the Horticulture Committee

 

THE ENGSTROM AWARD – This handsome 10” by 15” walnut plaque with the bronze plate on which is engraved

THE ENGSTROM AWARD

Presented each year by the

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

for meritorious service

can now be seen in the Orange County Historical Museum. The Executive Committee voted to make this award, honoring Mrs. Alfred G. Engstrom, a former president of the society, and Chairman of the Historic Hillsborough Commission, annually to the person, organization or business making the greatest contribution toward the preservation of Hillsborough history. Dr. Charles H. Blake accepted the first award (1966) on behalf of the Charter Members (of the Society) at the program presented by the Society on November 4, 1966, as a part of the Bicentennial Celebration. When the restoration of the Burwell School is completed the plaque will be placed in the Society’s room there.

 

THE ORANGE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM is not a static spot. Plan to visit there frequently to see the new additions and to enjoy the temporary exhibits.

The long awaited mural was presented to the people of Orange County and accepted by Mr. Harvey Bennett, Chairman of the Board of the Orange County Commissioners November 5, 1966 as a part of the Bicentennial Celebration.

The mural, by Mr. Kenneth W. Whitsett, consists of three panels. The panel on the left pertains t the Colonial period – 1701-1771 – covering those events which led to the days of the Regulators through the Battle of Alamance between Gov. William Tryon and the Regulators.

At the right end, the third panel is confined to the days of the American Revolution in the years 1780-81 when Hillsborough and Orange County were called upon to support 3 armie – those of General Gates, General Greene, and Charles Earl Cornwallis and his majesty’s Royal Army.

The Center panel depicts the opening scene of the Ratification Convention, July 21, 1788, called by the North Carolina General Assembly to ratify the Constitution of the United States. Hillsborough at that time was the Capitol of the State.

 

MORE TO BE SEEN AT THE MUSEUM

Diorama of an Indian Village – Typical of Orange County during the 1700s. display made as a summer project of Efland Girl Scouts (Junior 712 and Cadet 324). Background painting by Mrs. Joyce Ward, Efland, N.C.

New portraits:

Large framed portrait of William Alexander Graham 1804-1875

Governor of North Carolina – 1845-1849

Secretary of Navy – 1850-1853

Whig Nominee for Vice-President – 1852

Confederate Senator

Graduate of University of North Carolina – 1824

Speaker of the North Carolina House 2 terms

Presented to the Museum by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hawkins Graham.

 

Framed photograph of Richard Stanford, Congressman 1767-1816

A photograph after a Gilbert Stuart miniature and presented to

the museum by Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Stanford, Sr., Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Very lovely framed portrait of Elizabeth Ann (Betsy) Vincent (1803-88)

Daughter of Thomas Vincent, France

Wife of Captain John Berry (1798-1870)

Picture loaned by Annie Lee Holt Wood of Monterey, Virginia to the Historic Hillsborough Commission and loaned to the Museum by the Commission.

Mantel Clock ca. 1861 – ticking and chiming – gift of the Rev. Mr. Roland C. Stubbins, Efland, North Carolina.

Old framed copy of the Declaration of Independence. Given in loving memory of Henriette Brown Gordon Longwell, a native of Hillsborough. Born at Dimmock’s Mill, June 8, 1867. Died October 3, 1942. Given by ner son, Mr. O.E. Longwell, Clayton, North Carolina; her daughter, Mrs. Maggie L. Moody, Plant City, Florida; and her daughter, Mrs. Ray L. Hayes, Danville, Virginia.

 

Handwritten arithmetic book by William B. Gordon, dated June, 1837. Given by his granddaughter, Mrs. Annie Vasseur Longwell, Clayton, N.C.

 

Ancient country reel – loaned by Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Blake, Hillsborough.

 

Penmanship workbook – loaned by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Terry.

 

Letter and engraving of George III – loaned by the Historic Hillsborough Commission.

Spoon mold from England. )

Shot mold from Massachusetts. )

Powder horn from Massachusetts. )

Small pewter inkwell from England )- given by Prof. and Mrs. Richmond P. Bond, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

 

Hart family genealogical narrative. )

Two Carolina Historical Reviews. )

Missouri Historical Review )- given by Mr. Durward T. Stokes, Graham, N.C.

 

Picture of Nathaniel Rochester. )

Copy of deed signed by Nathaniel Rochester. )

Copy of deed signed by William Churton )- given by the Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.

 

ON TEMPORARY EXHIBIT

Old glass – from the collection of Mrs. Allen H. Walker, Sr. – loaned

by Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Walker, Sr., Hillsborough

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THE LOCKHART – PHILLIPS CEMETERY

By Hugh Conway Browning

The Lockhart-Phillips Cemetery (41½ ft. X 41½ ft.) is located on the northerly side of East Tryon Street, and represents the southeast corner of Lot No. 101 in the original plan of the Town of Hillsborough.

 

Samuel Lockhart and his wife Catherin were residents of Augusta County, Virginia, as early as August 1746. In November 1766, Catherin Lockhart, apparently a widow at the time, acquired title to Lot No. 99, located at the northeast corner of Churton and Tryon Streets, Hillsborough, North Carolina. Catherin died in 1792, and in her Will she bequeathed “the dwelling hose square and lot whereon I now live and in possession of” to her son William Lockhart. She bequeathed the remainder of her property to her five daughters: Catherin Roads, Jean Holt, Sarah Farquhar, Elizabeth Micklejohn and Mary Smith. Jean Holt was the second wife of Michael Holt, Jr., Elizabeth Micklejohn was the wife of Rev. George Miclejohn and Sarah Farquhar was the wife of James Farquhar. Information as to the further identity of Catherin Roads and Mary Smith has not been determined.

 

William Lockhart acquired title to Lots No. 100 and 101, lying to the east of Lot No. 99, in 1798; however, other information indicates the probability that this represented the consummation of a purchase of these two lots which originated about 1779.

 

The western part of the Lockhart-Phillips Cemetery contains five graves of adults but the stone markers do not contain any identifications. The conclusion is that these five graves represent the burial places of: Catherin Lockhart, son of William and Sarah, who died in 1820.

 

James Phillips (1765-1847) was a prominent citizen of Hillsborough. He was an Elder of the Hillsborough Presbyterian Church and one of the ten persons who composed this Church at the time it was organized on September 25, 1816. In 1798, he acquired title to Hillsborough Town Lots No. 102 and 103 adjoining and lying to the east of Lot No. 101. He was party to a number of other real estate transactions, and his home was located at the northeast corner of Tryon and Cameron Streets, the location of the present-day home of Mrs. J.C. Webb. James Phillips married Nancy Lockhart (1782-1847) February 20, 1797. She was a daughter of William Lockhart and his wife Sarah.

 

The eastern part of the Lockhart-Phillips Cemetery contains five graves which appear to be those of children. The markers at two of these graves do not contain identifications. The remaining three contain markers with identifications as follows: James Cook (1817-1818); Mary J. Phillips, who died in 1820, and M.J. Phillips’ a part of this stone is missing and further information is not available. The other graves in this cemetery are: James Phillips (1765-1847); Nancy Phillips (1782-1847); Francis B. Phillips (1804-1824); Ann Lewelling (1809-1840), and Doct. Elijah Lewelling (1801-1836), daughter and son-in-law respectively of James and Nancy Phillips, and Solomon Fuller (1812-1851), also a son-in-law of James and Nancy, and husband of their daughter, Eliza May. After Solomon’s death, his widow married John Y. Adams. There is another grave immediately north of the grave of Solomon Fuller without identifying markers. It is assumed that this represents the burial place of Eliza May Phillips Fuller Adams.

 

One of the daughters of Soloman and Eliza Phillips Fuller, Virginia A., married John W. Blackwood, December 17, 1860, and another daughter, Mary J., married Thomas D. Tinnen, April 27, 1869. Both of these daughters of Solomon and Eliza, together with their husbands are buried in the Tinnin Plot in the Hillsborough Cemetery.

 

The Rev. George Micklejohn died in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, about June 1818. In his Last Will and Testament, dated September 26, 1793, and probated in February 1819, he named his wife Elizabeth, and seven children; William, Robert, Elizabeth, James, Thomas, Catherin, and George.

 

Michael Holt, Jr., and his wife Jean Lockhart Holt had a number of descendants: one of their great-grandsons, Thomas Michael Holt (1831-1896) served as Governor of North Carolina (1891-1893). Another of their descendants is the Rev. Ivan lee Holt (1886-       ), Bishop of the Methodist Church, St. Louis, Missouri.

 

The Lockhart-Phillips Cemetery – Continued

John P. Lockhart and Levi Y. Lockhart of the St. Mary’s Community, and Gaston B. Lockhart of the New Hope Community, prominent citizens of Orange County during the latter 1800’s and early 1900’s, were great-grandsons of William and Sarah Lockhart. One of their sisters, Margaret, was the great-grandmother of Frederick Thomas Claytor, present-day Mayor of the Town of Hillsborough.

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The cemetery, long overgrown with weeds, honeysuckle and poison ivy was cleaned and the rock wall has been repaired under the supervision of Mr. Browning. An identification plaque will be placed there soon.

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We hope to see all the society’s members and their friends on February 10, 1967 and again April 22 and 23, 1967.

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 29

Hillsborough Historical Society Inc.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

NEWS-LETTER NO.29

Vol.  V, No.  29                           September, 1966

 

CALL TO THE 1966 ANNUAL MEETING

 

– – – – – –

 

Friday Evening

October 14, 1966                                      8:00 P.M.

The New Courthouse

Hillsborough, N.C.

 

– – – – – –

 

All members of the Hillsborough Historical Society are urged to attend the fifth Annual Meeting of the Society on Friday evening, October 14, 1966, at 8:00 P.M. in the New Courthouse, Hillsborough. A notification of the program to be presented will be mailed to you later.

After a business session, the society will elect its officers for the 1966-1967 year. The Nominating Committee (Mrs. Don S. Matheson, Chm. Mr. Quentin Patterson, Mrs. D.E. Hollandsworth, Mr. Dalton Loftin, and Mr. A.B. Coleman, Jr.) submits to the Society the following slate of officers for 1966-1967:

President                               – Mr. John Mason Roberts

Vice-President                       – Dr. George B. Daniel, Jr.

Secretary                                – Miss Peggy Trull

Treasurer                               – Miss Elizabeth H. Collins

Board Members:

– Mrs. John Graham Webb – 5 year

term replacing Mr. Don S.

Matheson whose term has expired

These four members are     – Mr. James H. Coman

serving continuing terms                 (4 year term)

and are not subject to          – Mrs. Marion B. Roberts

re-election                                          (3 year term)

– Dr. Charles H. Blake

(2 year term)

– Mr. Hugh Conway Browning

(1 year term)

Note:   Any individual member of the Society may make a nomination for any office by (1) securing the consent of the nominee, and (2) transmitting his nomination in writing to the Secretary at least five days before the Annual Meeting. Such a written nomination must contain a statement to the effect that the nominee or nominees have consented to their names being placed in nomination and that they will serve in the respective offices.

 

MEMBERSHIP ROLL, 1965-1966

THE HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC.

(Year ending October, 1966)

HONORARY MEMBER

Nash, Mrs. Frank, Box 482, Hillsborough, N.C.

LIFE MEMBERS

Blake, Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Chatwood, Faucette Mill Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce, Box 395, Durham, N.C.

Cotton, Mrs. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Draper-Savage, Mr. Edward T., Moorefields, Hillsborough, N.C.

Engstrom, Dr. and Mrs. Alfred G. 118 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Holeman, Miss Jean, 109 Forest Wood Drive, Durham, N.C.

Johnston, Mr. James M., 900 Southern Bldg., Washington D.C.

Kenan, Mr. Frank H., Box 2537 N. Durham Station, Durham, N.C.

McKenna, Mrs. Richard M., 11 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Roberts, Mr. John Mason, W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Stoney, Mrs. A.B., 509 W. Union St., Morganton, N.C.

CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS

Bason, Mrs. George F., 737 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Berry, Mr. and Mrs. John, 2122 N. Lakeshore Dr., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Blackwelder, Miss Ruth, Rt. 2, Box 364 R, Charlotte, N.C.

Borland, Judge and Mrs. A.H., 1600 High St., Durham, N.C.

Brower, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S., 2543 Sevier St., Durham, N.C

Browning, Mr. H. Conway, 1 Mile SE of St. Mary’s, Hillsborough, N.C.

Crawford, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M., Colonial Inn, Hillsborough, N.C.

Daniel, Dr. and Mrs. George B. Jr., 2 Gooseneck Rd., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Dillingham, Mr. and Mrs. George M., 1401 Caswell Road, Chapel Hill, N.C

Gay, Mr. and Mrs. James E., Jr., 754 N. Stratford Rd., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Hopewell, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr., Rt. 2, Hillsborough, N.C.

Kellenberger, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 806 Parkway, Greensboro, N.C.

Labouisse, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Fairntosh, Box 8005, North Durham Station, Durham N.C

Lindsay, Mrs. Hal, 1803 Ridgewood Dr., Atlanta, Ga.

Orgain, Mrs. Edward S., 3321 Devon Road, Durham, N.C.

Piper, Mr. and Mrs. Joe H., 516 Cleveland St., Greenville, S.C.

Prince, Mr. and Mrs. S.R., High Rock Farm, Rt. 1, Reidsville, N.C.

Scott, Mrs. Don E., Sr., 619 N. Main St., Graham, N.C.

Von Lennep, Mme. Eric N., Didam, Bridgewater, Conn.

Walser, Prof. Richard, Box 5308, Raleigh, N.C.

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. James, 511 Cornwallis Drive, Greensboro, N.C.

Williams, Mrs. Clem. C., 3922 Ingomar St., Washington, D.C.

ANNUAL MEMBERS

Altvater, Mr. and Mrs. F.V., 771 York St., Denver, Colorado

Anderson, Dr. and Mrs. Carl L., Cabe Ford Farm, Rt. 2, Durham, N.C.

Andrews, Dr. Nita, Catawba College, Salisbury, N.C.

Andrews, Dr. and Mrs. T.M., Bolin Brook Farm, Rt. 1, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Arrasmith, Mrs. Wm. Strudwick, 329 N. Bonner Ave. St. Matthews, Louisville, Ky.

Auman, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn, Rt. 3, Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Bain, Mrs. R. Allan, 607 West Front St., Burlington, N.C.

Ballard, Mr. and Mrs. John, Box 900, Hillsborough, N.C.

Barbour, Mrs. Josephine, 4435 Park Road, Alexandria, Va.

Barbour, Mrs. Nancy C., Appinwood Farm, Hillsborough, N.C.

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. E.P., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Beard, Mr. and Mrs. L.E., 134 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Beeler, Dr. and Mrs. James Rush, 1386-B Mount Vernon Ave., Williamsburg, Va.

Berry, Mrs. Mary Strudwick, 304 Wentworth Dr., Greensboro, N.C.

Bivins, Mr. and Mrs. O.E., Hillsborough, N.C.

Blackley, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J., Rt. 1, Box 90, Happy Valley Farm, Hillsborough, N.C.

Blackwood, Miss Mattie E., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Blaine, Prof, J.C.D., Greenwood Road, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Blake, Mrs. Fred, 314 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Blalock, Mr. and Mrs. Julian H., 100 Cherokee Rd., Hampton, Va.

Bloodworth, Mrs. T.S.M., 963 Wellington Rd., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Bonar, Dr. and Mrs. Robert A., Rt. 2, Box 407-A, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Bond, Prof. and Mrs. Richmond P., 101 Pine Lane, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Bonds, Mrs. Louise M., 3754 Faxon Ave., Memphis, Tenn.

Booker, Mr. Curtis, Rt. 2, Chapel Hill, N.C

Booker, Mr. and Mrs. John G., Rt. 2, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Boone, Dr. and Mrs. W. Waldo, 3921 Nottaway Rd., Durham, N.C.

Boyd, Mrs. Spotswood, 3018 Randolph Drive, Raleigh, N.C.

Bradshaw, Dr. and Mrs. Francis Foster, Box 456, Camel Valley, Calif.

Brinton, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh P., 12 Davie Circle, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Brown, Miss Estelle, Methodist Retirement Home, 2616 Erwin Rd., Durham, N.C.

Brown, Mr. Grady A., Occoneechee Farm, Hillsborough, N.C.

Brown, Mrs. H.H. 4925 Camino Real. Tucson, Arizona.

Brown, Mr. Henry N., III, 3687 Northwood Drive, Memphis, Tenn.

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert M., 401 E. Lavendar St., Durham, N.C.

Brown, Miss Joyce, 4925 Camino Real, Tucson, Arizona.

Browning, Miss Kate, Rt. 2, Durham, N.C.

Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. Victor S., Sr., 1012 Vickers Ave., Norfolk, Va.

Burke, Miss Evelyn F., 6300 Richmond Place, Norfolk, Va.

 

Cameron, Miss Annie S., Box 644, Hillsborough, N.C.

Carr, Mr. and Mrs. G. Paul, Box 627, Hillsborough, N.C.

Carr, Mr. and Mrs. John W., 141 E. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Carr, Mrs. W.C., 106 S. Tremont Dr., Greensboro, N.C.

Carroll, Mrs. Adrian, 627 Fountain Place. Burlington, N.C.

Carroll, Dr. and Mrs. L.W., Box 475, Hillsborough, N.C.

Carter, Miss Grace, 361 Miller St., S.W., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Carter, Miss Ruth, 361 Miller St., S.W., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Fred S., Jr., 112 W. Union St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Cates, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, Jr., Box 167, Hillsborough, N.C.

Caviness, Dr. and Mrs. Verne S., 109 N. Boylan Ave., Raleigh, N.C.

Cheape, Miss Kathleen S., 9 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Clare, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin, 3509 Sheridan Drive, Durham, N.C.

Clayton, Mrs. Louise R., 121 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Claytor, Mr. and Mrs. Fred, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cobb, Mrs. Collier & Miss Mary L., 517 E. Franklin St., Chapell Hill, N.C.

Cobb, Mr. and Mrs. Collier, Jr., 603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Coker, Mr. C.F.W., Box 1563, Raleigh, N.C.

Cole, Mrs. C.C., Box 431, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cole, Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Jr., Rt. 1, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cole Mr. and Mrs. E. Wilson, St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. A.B. Jr., Hillsborough, N.C.

Collins, Miss Elizabeth H., Highlands, Hillsborough, N.C.

Collins, Col. H.W., 809 Elizabeth St., Fort Collins, Colorado.

Coman, Mr. and Mrs. James H., Jr., Rt. 3, Hillsborough, N.C.

Copeland, Mr. and Mrs. Eric, 1007 Norwood Ave., Durham, N.C.

Core, Mrs. George E., 158 W. Margaret Lane, Box 79, Hillsborough, N.C.

Cotton, Dr. Lyman A., 520 Hooper Lane, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Craig, Mr. and Mrs. Glbert. Rt. 2, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Craig, Miss Jean, 706 Piedmont St., Reidsville, N.C.

Craig, Mr. Luther M., 104 Hilton Ave., Durham, N.C.

Craig, Mr. P.H., Jr., Box 1, Hillsborough, N.C.

Crandall, Mrs. John R., 148 Oak Haven Ave., Macon, Georgia

Crispell, Dr. Raymond S., Towne House Apt. 5-E, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Currie, Mrs. John M., Carthage, N.C.

 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Archie R., 52 Beverly Drive, Durham, N.C.

Davis, Mrs. Carl, E. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Donnan, Mrs. R.L., Box 885, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Dority, Mrs. C.F., W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Dorsett, Mr. and Mrs. William C., Rt. 1, Efland, N.C.

Dowdy, Mr. and Mrs. E.R., 408 N. Churton St., Hillsborough, N.C.

DuBose, Mr. and Mrs. D. St. Pierre, Box 310, Durham, N.C.

Duckett, Mrs. E. DuVal, “Big Oaks”, Blanch, N.C.   (Winter: 2419 King St., Alexandria, Va.)

Edmister, Mrs. Floyd, Rt. 1, Univ. Lake Drive, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Efland, Mrs. Lindsay, Box 131, Efland, N.C.

Elder, Mrs. James P., Jr., Box 2164, Elon College, N.C.

 

Felts, Mrs. Frances Carter, 709 Watson Ave., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Ffrench, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R., 2400 Belvedere Dr., Baytown, Texas

Flinn, Mrs. Lawrence, Lilly Pond Lane, E. Hampton, Long Island, N.Y.

Flower, Mr. and Mrs. Walter D., 12 Claremont Ave., Maplewood, N.J.

Forrest, Mr. and Mrs. Bedford B., 114 N. Wake St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Forrest, Mrs. Louise and Miss Joan. Efland, N.C.

Forrest, Mrs. Robert O., West Cobb Dormitory, UNC., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Fowler, Mr. and Mrs. M.M., 2023 Club Blvd. Durham, N.C.

Franck, Mrs. Martha L., 801 Onslow St., Durham, N.C.

Fudge, Rev. and Mrs. Sam, Rt. 3, Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Gardiner, Mrs. Leo, Box 575, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Gattis, Miss Jean, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Gattis, Mrs. Virginia, 655 N. Spring St., Winston-Salem, N.C.

Gilbert. Mrs. John R., 301 Pritchard Ave., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Gilmore, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Box 86, Hillsborough, N.C.

Gilmore, Miss Jill, Box 86, Hillsborough, N.C.

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs. B.P., Jr., Box 195, Hillsborough, N.C.

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs, B.P., Sr., 209 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Graham, Mr. and Mrs. A.H., Montrose, Hillsborough, N.C.

Graham, Dr. and Mrs. William A., 2247 Cranford Rd., Durham, N.C.

 

Hamlin, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J., W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Hayes, Miss Sue B., 127 E. Union St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Herndon, Mr. and Mrs. Fred J., Massey’s Chapel Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Hicks, Mr. and Mrs. Frank D., Ridgewood Lane, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas G., Rt. 2, Box 373, Durham, N.C.

Hill, Mrs. Erle G., 173 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough, N.C.

Holden, Mr. John A., Box 373, La Place, La.

Hollandsworth, Mr. and Mrs. D.E., Maple Hill Farm, Rt., Hillsborough, N.C.

Hooper, Mrs. R.L., 510 Woodlawn Ave., Greensboro, N.C.

Hopkins, Mrs. Florence B., Rt. 2, Box 119, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Hubbard, Rev. and Mrs. Charles S., 1206 Branch St., Wilson, N.C.

Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. J.P., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Isenhour, Mr. and Mrs. Vance, Rt. 1, Hillsborough, N.C.

Isley, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W., Cedar Grove, N.C.

Ives, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest L., Paint Hill Farm, Southern Pines, N.C.

 

James, Mrs. C.J., and Miss Charlotte, W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Jervis, Mr. and Mrs. Carl, 229 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Johnston, Mr. and Mrs. Ben, 131 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence D., Eno Lodge, Hillsborough, N.C.

Jones, Mr. Joe, Box 660, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L., IV, 133 Hale St., Beverly, Mass.

Jones, Mrs. Kenneth R., II, Box 116, Vanceboro, N.C.

 

Kenion, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S., Hwy. 70A East, Hillsborough, N.C.

Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. G.M., 401 Patterson Place, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S., Ayr Mount, Hillsborough, N.C.

Knight, Mr. and Mrs. C.D., Box 201, Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Latta, Mr. and Mrs. Harold F., Hwy. 57 N., Hillsborough, N.C.

Laws, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ed, 309 N. Churton St., Hillsborough, N.C.

LeGrand, Mrs. John Q., Box 428, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Lester, Mrs. Robert M., 606 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Levings, Mrs. George E., II, St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. H.H., 1402 Virginia Ave., Durham, N.C.

Lineberger, Mrs. Adrian, Sr., 2 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Link, Mr. and Mrs. J.M., Rt. 2, Durham, N.C.

Little, Mrs. William B., 608 Wanaka Circle, Wadesboro, N.C.

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Allen A., W. Tyron St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Rt. 3, Hillsborough, N.C.

Lloyd, Mrs. T.E., 143 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough, N.C.

Lockhart, Mrs. Christine C., Presbyterian Church, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Lockhart, Mrs. D.K., 805 Watts St., Durham, N.C.

Lockhart, Mrs. E.M., 109 N. Wake St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. E.M., Jr., 516 Platt Terrace, Aiken, S.C.

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. John K., 161 Orchard St., Mount Airy, N.C.

Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. L.B., 186 E. Wesley Rd., N.E., Atlanta, Ga.

Lockhart, Miss Mary Jane, 805 Watts St., Durham, N.C.

Loftin, Mr. and Mrs. Dalton H., N. Cameron St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Loy, Mrs. Henry S., Roanoke Rapids, N.C.

Lynch, Mrs. Cora L., Hillsborough, N.C.

Lynch, Mr. Edwin M., 312 N. Churton St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. William F., 140 E. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

 

MacLamroc, Mr. and Mrs. James G.W., Allan & Brian, Box 1588, Greensboro, N.C.

 

MacLeod, Mrs. John Blount, 214 Glandon Drive, Chapel Hill, N.C.

McCulley, Miss Dorothy Jane, 3754 Faxon Ave., Memphis, Tenn.

McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W., 800 Christopher Rd., Chapel Hill, N.C.

McMahon, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P., 2311 Carver St., Durham, N.C.

McMichael, Mrs. P.D., 714 Parkway Blvd., Reidsville, N.C.

McMillan, Mrs. William O., 901 Pembroke Road, Greensboro, N.C.

 

Maadry, Mrs. Charles E., Raleigh Apts., R-4, Raleigh, N.C.

Martin, Mr. and Mrs. R.B., Box 964, Hillsborough, N.C.

Massengale, Mrs. Robert, 7 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Matheson, Mr. and Mrs. D.S., E. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Matheson, Miss Elizabeth, 15 East 71st St., Apt. 3B, New York, N.Y.

Miller, Mrs. Annie D., 414 Brook Drive, Falls Church, Va.

Miller, Miss Elizabeth Lyon, 414 Brook Drive, Falls Church, Va.

Miller, Mrs. Garland F., 218 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Minnis, Rev. and Mrs. J.F., Rt. 3, Box 42, Hillsborough, N.C.

Mitchell, Mr. William, Box 765, Hillsborough, N.C.

Moon, Col. And Mrs. Jacob P., Hillsborough, N.C.

Moore, Dr. and Mrs. H.W., 116 W. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Murray, Mr. Guy Bruce, Rt. 5, Box 248, Durham, N.C.

 

Neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. R.C., Box 763, Hillsborough, N.C.

Nicks, Mrs. S.F., 144 N. Wake St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Noble, Miss Alice, 214 Hillsborough St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Nunn, Mrs. Dorris J., 4400 Stringtown Road, Evansville, Indiana

Nunn, Mr. Leonard R., 726 Stratford Road, Winston-Salem, N.C.

Nunn, Mrs. Lockett, P.O. Box 596, Evansville, Indiana

Nunn, Mrs. W.S., Rt. 2, Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. John A., 219 Ransom St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Parsley, Mrs. Oscar G., James M., & Wm. A., Hillsborough, N.C.

Patterson, Mrs. D.E. Sr., 131 E. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. E.E., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Patterson, Mr. J.W., Rt. 3, Box 114-E. Hot Springs, Arkansas

Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. Quentin W., Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough, N.C.

Pegg, Mrs. Carl, 403 Laurel Rd., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Pleasants, Dr. and Mrs. John E., 2536 Dryden Rd., Houston, Texas

Phipps, Judge and Mrs. L.J., 315 Pittsboro St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Pollard, Mr. W.R., Box 616, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Preddy, Mrs. Graydon M., 2207 The Circle, Raleigh, N.C.

Preyer, Mr. and Mrs. L. Richardson, 605 Sunset Drive, Greensboro, N.C.

 

Rape, Mrs. Harvey, 207 Pineview Road, Durham, N.C.

Redden, Mrs. Alma C., 314 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough, N.C.

Richmond, Mr. and Mrs. J.W., 175 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Riddick, Miss Imogene, 310 Fairview Dr., Lexington, N.C.

Ridenhour, Mrs. Baxter, 415 Englewood Ave., Durham, N.C.

Ridenhour, Mr. and Mrs. C.A., 32 White Lane, Concord, N.C.

Riley, Mrs. Herbert, 130 N. Wake St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Rives, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence, 1704 Park Ave., Richmond, Va.

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. B.W., 1503 Pettigrew St., Durham, N.C.

Roberts, Dr. and Mrs. Marion B., 108 N. Hazel St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Z.R., Box 322, Hillsborough, N.C.

Rogers, Mrs. H.W., 806 Brunson Dr., Albemarle, N.C.

Rollins, Mr. and Mrs. Steed, 33 Oak Drive, Durham, N.C.

Royall, Col. And Mrs. Henry E., 105 Noble St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Ruffin, Mrs. William C., 815 E. Massachusetts Ave., Southern Pines, N.C.

 

Sandell, Mrs. O.R., Hwy. 70A East, Hillsborough, N.C.

Scott, Mrs. Cutris C., 121 W. Tyron St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Scott, Mr. Ralph H., Box 909, Burlington, N.C.

Sharpe, Mrs. Luther, 107 S. Hazel St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Sheffer, Mrs. Charlotte, Box 115, Richwoods, Missouri

Shepherd, Mrs. Grant, W. Union St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Sheilds, Mrs. C.W., 227 Vance St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Shope, Mr. and Mrs. J.M., Rt. 3, Hillsborough, N.C.

Singer, Mrs. Samuel, 80-20 Broadway, Elmhurst 73, Long Island, N.Y.

Sizemore, Mr. and Mrs. W.D., Rt. 1, Box 141, Durham, N.C.

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. James C., II, 9911 Colony Rd., Fairfax, Va.

Snipes, Mr. and Mrs. J.L., 6315 Ackel Apt., 30A, Metairie, New Orleans, La.

Spurgeon, Miss Carrie M., 421 Guilford Circle, Raleigh, N.C.

Spurgeon, Miss Mary, Hillsborough, N.C.

Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. Durward T., Box 168, Graham, N.C.

Street, Mr. and Mrs. Robert B., Rt. 1, Box 405, Huntersville, N.C.

Strudwick, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund, Jr., 1800 Monument Ave., Richmond, Va.

Strudwick, Mr. Lewis C., 1200 Poplar Hill Rd., Baltimore, Maryland

Stubbins, Rev. Roland, Box 5, Efland, N.C.

Sugg, Dr. Eugene S., Rt. 1, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sugg, Mr. and Mrs. W.A., Jr., 420 Lawndale Drive, Winston-Salem, N.C.

Suitt, Mr. and Mrs. Volnar R., 307 Watts St., Durham, N.C.

Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 310 Watts St., Durham, N.C.

Suttenfield, Mr. William H., Queens Towers, 1300 Queens Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Sweaney, Dr. and Mrs. Hunter, 1007 Vickers Ave., Durham, N.C.

 

Tally, Mr. and Mrs. Arby C., 3501 Duke Homestead Rd., Durham, N.C.

Tapp, Mr. Vernon L., Rt. 2, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Teer, Mr. and Mrs. George W., 145 E. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Thompson, Miss Ella Graves, Leasburg, N.C.

Tinnin, Mrs. George W., 1319 Ft. Bragg Rd., Fayetteville, N.C.

Tison, Mrs. Benjamin T., III, P.O. Box 100, Durham, N.C.

Todd, Mr. John Hart, P.O. Box 23, 1985 Shrine Bldg., Memphis, Tenn.

Tolbert, Mr. Noble, Jr., Box 616, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Trull, Miss Margaret L., Highlands, Hillsborough, N.C.

Turner, Major Frances B., B-3-105 Riverside Park, Hopewell, Va.

Turner, Mrs. H.M., 304 S. Seventh St., Mebane, N.C.

Turner, Dr. Herbert S., 315 N. Coalter St., Staunton, Virginia

Tyler, Mrs. E. Runyon, 1524 Hermitage Court, Durham, N.C.

 

Umstead, Miss Jane Mary, Rt. 2, Box 14, Durham, N.C.

Umstead, Mrs. Irvin E., Rt. 2 Box 14, Durham, N.C.

 

Wade, Rev. and Mrs. J.H., E. Union St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Wager, Dr. Paul W., 206 University Drive, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Allen H., Sr., E. Tryon St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Donald, 123 W. Union St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G., Mebane, N.C.

Wall, Miss Rebecca B., Heartsease, 115 E. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Ward, Dr. Calvin L., 1726 Duke University Rd., Durham, N.C.

Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Ira A., 1504 Michaux Rd., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Warren, Dr. and Mrs. A.J., Ashbrook Farm, Chester Springs, Penna.

Warren, Mrs. J.A., 301 Hillsborough St., Chapel Hill, N.C.

Wasden, Mrs. Charles N., 2486 Vineville Ave., Macon, Georgia

Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. J.R., St. Mary’s Road, Hillsborough, N.C.

Webb, Miss Annie R., Boylan Apts., C-103, Raleigh, N.C.

Webb, Miss Freda, 2734 Rothgeb Dr., Raleigh, N.C.

Webb, Miss Isabelle, 117 E. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Webb, Mrs. J.C., Box 634, Hillsborough, N.C.

Webb, Mr. James, Jr., 732 Seabrook Cove Rd., Jacksonville, Florida

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. John Graham, 117 E. Queen St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Webb, Miss Louise C., 101 Ingleside Drive, Concord, N.C.

Webb, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Beverly, 2126 Norton Rd., Charlotte, N.C.

Webb, Mrs. Thomas H., 101 Ingleside Drive, Concord, N.C.

Webb, Mr. William Norwood, 511 Cornwallis Drive, Greensboro, N.C.

Weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Mangum Weeks, 219 N. Royal St., Alexandria, Va.

Welborn, Mrs. Allen B., 717 Farris Ave., High Point, N.C.

Welch, Mr. and Mrs. George S., 377 Tenney Circle, Chapel Hill, N.C.

White, Mr. and Mrs. W.H., 1809 Independence Road, Greensboro, N.C.

Whitted, Mr. and Mrs. H.E., Jr., 3710 Kirklees Road, Winston-Salem, N.C.

Williams, Mr. Paul Reid, Box 826, Hillsborough, N.C.

Winecoff, Mr. and Mrs. K.C., 127 W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Witherspoon, Mr. Henry Kollock, 2630 Fairview Road, Raleigh, N.C.

 

JUNIOR MEMBERS

Forrest, Miss Josephine, 114 N. Wake St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Riley, Mr. Bobbie, Box 145, Elfand, N.C.

Smith, Miss Sue, Box 707, Hillsborough, N.C.

 

TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: 467

 

NECROLOGY

Arrasmith, Mr. William Strudwick, 329 N. Bonner Ave., St. Matthew’s, Louisville, Ky.

Dority, Mr. Clarence F., W. King St., Hillsborough, N.C.

Holeman, Miss Hallie, 109 Forest Wood Drive, Durham, N.C.

Leavings, Col. George F., St. Mary’s Rd., Hillsborough, N.C.

 

 

By action of the Executive Board, our fiscal year has been altered to coincide with the calendar year, so this year your membership dues are payable by January 1, 1967. We need your dues to keep all of our good work going in Historic Hillsborough, so don’t forget to send us your check before the Christmas rush.

If you are a brand-new member who joined after July 1, of this year (1966), you wont owe us any further dues until January 1, 1968; but all other members’ dues are payable by January 1, 1967.

Fill out the form below, and double check it to see that your name, address and ZIP code are written clearly. Indicate the type of membership desired, detach the form, and mail it with your check (payable to the Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.) to the Secretary, Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc., Box 871, Hillsborough, N.C. 27278.

 

 

 

Detach here:

Date

The Secretary

Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc.

Box 871

Hillsborough, N.C. 27278

 

Dear Secretary:

Here are my dues ($_______________) for a ___________________________ membership in the Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc., for the year January 1, 1967 to January 1, 1968.

 

Annual Membership ($3 per year)

Family Membership ($5 per year)

(Husband and Wife)

Contributing Member ($10 per year)

Life Membership ($90 – to be paid within three years)

Junior Membership ($1 per year) – for members through 18 years of age.

 

Name ______________________

Address ______________________

______________________

Zip Code____________

Hillsborough Historical Society Newsletter No. 28

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC.

Member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Hillsborough, North Carolina

NEWS-LETTER NO. 28

Vol. V, No. 28                                                    June, 1966

MEMBERSHIP: Now 448 (revised list as of May 24, 1966). NEW LIFE MEMBERS (transferred from Active Memberships): Mrs. Richard M McKenna, 11 Cobb Terrace, Chapel Hill, N. C.: Mr. John Mason Roberts, W Tryon St., Hillsborough, N. C.

NEW ANNUAL MEMBERS: Mrs. Spotswood Boyd, 3018 Randolph Drive, Raleigh, N. C.; Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Coleman, Jr., Hillsborough, N. C.: Mr. and Mrs.

Gilbert Craig, Rt. #2, Chapel Hill, N.C.; Mrs. John M Currie, Carthage, N. C.; Mrs. R. L. Donnan, Box 885, Chapel Hill, N. C.; Mrs. Floyd H. Edmister, Rt#1, University Lake Drive, Chapel Hill, N. C.; Mr. and Mrs.

Joseph L. Jones, IV, 133 Hale St., Beverly, Mass.; Mrs Baxter Ridenhour, 415 Englewood Ave, Durham, N. C.; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sullivan, 310 Watts St., Durham, N. C.

NEW JUNIOR MEMBERS: Robbie Riley, Box 145, Efland, N. C.; Susan Smith, Box 707, Hillsborough, N. C.

NEW THINGS TO SEE AT THE HISTORICAL MUSEUM;

1. TWO VERY EARLY HAND-MADE BONNETS – Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Alex Anderson, W. Queen St., Hillsborough, N. C.

a. GRANDMOTHER HANNAH WHARTON’S BONNET – Apparently a child’s bonnet. Quilted line-green challis material, lined bound and faced with thin blue silk.

b. AUNT SUSAN ANDERSON’S BONNEY- Quilted beige foulard silk, lined; trimmed with narrow braid. Silk bow at back with ribbons. Obviously a “Sunday bonney”.

2. GENERAL ROBERT E LEE’S GENERAL ORDER NO 9 (to John W. Hooper, father of R. A. Hooper) – Gift of Miss Maggie Hooper Roberts, Rt.#1, Hillsborough, N. C.

Note: This is a single sheet, handwritten, mended with cellophane tape.

“Headquarters Army Northern Virginia

General Order No. 9                                                                           April 10, 1865

“After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield (sic) to overwhelming numbers and resources (sic) I need not tell the brave survivors of so many hard fought battles who hav (sic) remained steadfast to the last, that I have concented (sic) to this result from no distrust of them… By the terms of the agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and intill (sic) exchanged.

 

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“With an unceasing admiration of your consistency and devotion to your country, and a greatful (sic) remembrance of your kind and generous consideration for myself I bid you an affectionate farewell.

R. E. Lee, General”

GROUP OF FOUR ITEMS FROM MRS. FRANK NASH, HILLSBOROUGH, N. C.:

a. CHILD’S DECORATED CHINA TEA SET – 10 pieces (small tray, 2 cups and saucers, tea pot, sugar and cream) – pale green border, gilded edge, small floral decoration in pink and green. Guilt lettering, “For a good Child”, on tray.

b. POSTAL CARD SHOWING FOUR CHILDREN using the tea set (above).

c. FRAMMED PICTURE (SMALL) OF MISS SUSAN MARY KIRKLAND (1843-1914), One of the early pupils at the Nash and Kollock School and later Principal of the State Normal College at Greensboro (now UNC-G).

d. TWO XEROX COPIERS OF LETTERS FROM THE EILERS FAMILY of  WILMINGTON, N. C.

1. Civil War letter (undated) from Matilda Eilers, student at the Nash and Kollock School, to her brother Edward H. Eilers, at Elizabethtown, N. C.:

“Many weeks have flown by since I have heard from you. This letter may never reach you, but if it should, please do everything in your power to get me home. I have not received a single line from home since the fall, and can scarcely account for their silence, unless they have left there, owing to the fever. I heard that those Miserable Yankees had passed your section of the country. I do hope they left you unmolested… This village (Hillsborough) is in the hands of the Yankees and has been for some time. We have had a guard around the school, and have not been troubled by them in the least…

Your dear sister.

Matilda

“P.S. Do everything in your to get me home.”

2. Letter dated May 5, 1865, from Matilda Eilers’ father H. B. Eilers of Wilmington, N. C.

“…there are good many coming (sic) home from Gen. Johnson’s army & and some have been at Hillsborough for a week who inform me that the seminary (that is, the Nash and Kollock School) is going on as usual but have not been there so as to get letters.”

4. FOUR PAIRS OF EARLY SPECTICLES – Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Ward Boring, Oxford, N. C.:

a. Gentleman’s pince-nez on cord – with case.

b. Delecate gold spectacles (extra strong lens).

c. Dark Spectacles.

d. Very fragile metal (silvered) frame; lens moderately strong.

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5. FOUR ITEMS RELATING TO SILVERSMITH WILLIAM HUNTINGTON (all originally the property of Mrs. Volnar R. Suitt, 307 Watts st., Durham, N. C.)

a. PHOTOGRAPH OF WILLIAM HUNTINGTON (1792-1894) and his wife, Frances R. Howze Huntington, married Dec. 9, 1819. Picture is inscribed, Marion, Ala. Sept 1972. Wm. Huntington aged 80 F.R. Huntington 70 yrs. 8 mos.” Gift of Mrs. Suitt to Hillsborough Presbyterian Church. Copied, by permission, for the Museum.

b. WEDDING ANNIVERSARY POEM  of 16 lines composed by William Huntington for his 50th wedding anniversary. Written in his neat engravers copperplate on the back of the above picture. Reproduced, by permission, for the Museum.

c. BOOK OWNED BY WILLIAM HUNTINGTON – Volume I of 2-Vol. set, Meditations and Contemplations by the Rev. James Hervey (New York, 1824). Dupdecimo; bound in full calk; gold-tooled spine; hinges broken. Marbled end-papers.

d. PHOTOGRAPH OF FIR BRANCH from Dr. Elisha Mitchell’s grave on the summit of Mount Mitchell. (Presemably Miss Alice C. Heartt had visited the grave and sent the piece of fir to her friends, the Huntingtons, in Marlon Alabama.)

William Huntington copied this excerpt from Miss Alice Heartt’s letter on the back of the photograph:

“No Stone marks the grave of Dr. Mitchell; a dwarfed evergreen stands at it’s head as a sentinel on his lonely watch. From it I brought the piece of fir, which I sent to you. The Moss I obtained a few steps down the mountain, as growth is imperfect on the summit…

“ It is wonderful the Stronghold Dr. Mitchell had upon the affections of those mountaineers.

“They were really distressed when it was proposed to remove his remains elsewhere; and his name is never mentioned by them, except with a loving reverence…

“Copied by Wm. Huntington, Aged 80 years, Marion Ala.”

6. PILGRAM’S PROGRESS (1856 edition, cloth-bound) – Gift of Miss Annie Dodson, Hillsborough, N. C.

7. NEW SALES ITEM – JEWELRY “HANDCRAFTED IN HILLSBOROUGH” by Mrs. Thomas S. Kenion. Small pins, ear-rings, and tie clasps utilizing a variety of gemstones (jade, tiger-eyes, agates, eventurines and goldstones) are available.

 

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THE “190” YEAR OF OUR FREEDOM TO BE OBSERVED ON JULY 4th

This year a porton of Hillsborough’s old-time celebration of the Fourth of July is being revived with some variations. The schedule for the program:

10:30 A.M. – Ceremony at William Hooper’s Grave, Old Town Cemetery

Invocation

Pledge  of Allegiance to the Flag

The American’s Creed

“The Signer in Hillsborough”

Laying of Wreath on Grave

Trumpet Solo

Benediction

The Orange High School Band will lead the way to the New Courthouse

11:30 A.M. – Reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Invocation

Reading of the Declaration of Independence by Hon. A.H. Graham

Presentation of the Representatives of the Thirteen United

Colonies

Benediction

12:00 – Ringing of all Church Bells in the Town of Hillsborough

The observance is being sponsored by the Historic Hillsborough Commission assisted by the Davie Poplar Chapter, DAR, and the Orange School Band. The committee in charge: Lucius M. Cheshore, Edwin J. Hamlin, Joe P. Hughes.

HILLSBOROUGH’S OLD-TIME FOURTH-OF-JULY CELEBRATION – A traditional pattern for Fourth-of-July celebrations was apparently handed down from Revolutionary days and adhered to more or less in Hillsborough until about the time of the Civil War.

MAKING PLANS – On or about June 12 Hillsborough citizens were notified by the ringing of a bell at high noon to gather in the court house to make plans for a celebration of “the __th year of our freedom.” A Grand Marshal of the Day was elected and various committees were appointed.

THE PROCESSION – on July 4th at 11:00 A.M. all citizens gathered at the Courthouse Square to march in procession to the Presbyterian Church. This was the order of the procession in 1825: Grand Marshal of the Day; Musicians; President of the Day; reader of the Declaration of Independence and Orator; Clergy; magistrate of police; Commissions of the Town; Visiting Strangers; Citizens generally.

THE READING OF THE DECLARATION – This was the most important event of the day, and the Declaration was read at the Presbyterian Church for many years. Rev. John Knox Witherspoon customarily delivered the invocation. The reader of the Declaration was always one of Hillsborough’s most distinguished citizens as was the Orator who delivered the Oration. We do not have a complete list of readers and orators, but we know that Archibald Murphey was Orator in 1804. Attorney John Scott, Esq., read the Declaration in 1822; Priestley H. Mangum, Esq., read it in 1823; Abraham Rencher

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(later Minister to Portugal) read it in 1825 – and so on. Rev. Robert Burwell read it in 1846 in the Courtroom of the newly built Courthouse.

THE “SUMPTUOUS” DINNER – Following the ceremony at the Church, a grand and glorious dinner was held at Faddis’ Tavern; in later years at the Masonic Hall. A President of the Day presided over the dinner, but there was also a Vice-President elected for good measure.

THE TOASTS AND “ODES” – These were prepared ahead of time by a carefully chosen committee and they were thereafter published (and sometimes revised). This was one of the most important rites of the day. There were always 13 “regular” toasts (in honor of the 13 colonies) and there might be as many as 18 “voluntary” ones (which were as carefully prepared as the regular ones). Thirteen glasses of any wine would certainly be a considerable amount, but apparently toasts usually numbered 24! Here are the toasts of 1822 with quotations from some of them:

1. The Fourth of July, 1776                           8. Benjamin Franklin

2. The Constitution of the U.S.                      9. Ex-President of the U.S.

3. The Congress of the U.S.                            10. Army of the U.S.

4. The President of the U.S.                           11. The Navy of the U.S. “It has fought itself into

5. The Judiciary of the U.S.                            favour. It’s made of hearts of oak, boys.”

6. George Washington                         12.  The State of North Carolina

7. The Heroes of the Revolution                    13. Agriculture and Commerce

– – – – – – –

14. The Arts and Sciences –                                                   20. The Orange Agricultural Society

“Wisdom is power”                                                                21. The Governor of N.C.

15. The University of North Carolina                                                22. The Supreme Court of N.C.

– “May the people learn to appreciate its value.”                  23. The General Assembly of N.C.

16. Internal Improvements                                                     24. “The Fair- “Line the sparkling

17. The Press – “Formidable to tyrants; the best                  wine, they seem sweeter as they

– preservation of free governments.”                                      approach our lips.”

18. The Constitution of North Carolina

– “It wants mending.”

19. The Independent Government of South America

GUN FIRE AND TORCHLIGHT PARADES – Companies of infantry apparently fired 13 rounds, and the little cannon on Courthouse Square was always loaded and fired. However, in 1825, Editor Dennis Heartt regretfully noted in the Hillsborough Recorder that “in the evening our little field piece which had assisted at the public rejoicings for half a century was injudiciously loaded and burst. Fortunately no person was injured.” The evening torchlight parade attracted swarms of University of North Carolina students from Chapel Hill.

– – – – – – –

The Recorder always noted that the Fourth of July was celebrated with “becoming hilarity”, but even in the early 1820’s the Sons of Temperance were bringing force and influence to bear to make it a “rational” celebration in 1823 after a splendid dinner at Mr. John Faddis’ Tavern the whole

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town of Hillsborough walked to the “Mountain Spring” and drank their 13 toasts (no extras) in plain, cold water. At intervals, “cold-water jubilees” were announced throughout the next decade, and one observance was described as being “as calm as the Sabbath day.”

———-

THE “AYR MOUNT” MURAL – An imaginative Chapel Hill builder recently commissioned talented artist Nancy Cornwell (Mrs. Milton Cornwell, Jr.) to paint a 5’ X 14’ mural for the dining-room of a new colonial-type house he was building in the Lake Forest section of Chapel Hill. Nancy’s mural, now completed and on view, uses the Kirkland estate, Ayr Mount, as a source of artistic inspiration. The red brick house in the mural is not quite Ayr Mount (nor was it intended to be), the trees are not exactly the real trees, nor are the circular drive and the old Green exactly reproduced, but the whole creation is so closely based on Ayr Mount that no one familiar with the Kirkland home could miss it. The two rabbits on the drive are a typical Cornwell touch (“I had to put something alive in it,” Nancy said.)

The mural, in various gray-greens and yellow greens with the red brick house as a focal point, covers one wall of the 14’ X 14’ room which is painted in oyster white. A near-by breakfast-room, papered in orange-red picks up a touch of red in the mural.

The house isn’t sold yet, but someone is bound to like the idea of a Hillsborough mural! Maybe other builders will pick up the idea.

———-

PROGRAM ON “EAGLE LODGE, NO. 19, A.F. & A.M” – Mr. Grady A. Brown, former principal of Hillsborough High School, presented a program to the Society on Friday evening, May 20, on historic Eagle Lodge, chartered in 1791. To illustrate his talk, Mr. Brown exhibited the Lodge’s valuable old Minute Books (now 175 years old, as he pointed out) and the Rev. William Mercer Green’s Address on the Laying of the Cornerstone of the (Old) Courthouse (see below).

Mr. Brown mentioned the Lodge’s “jewels” and the loss and replacement of one of them, its sword, its early meetings in John Taylor’s Tavern and the Courtney House (Now owned by the John W. Carrs), and the memorable occasion when, led by Worshipful Master Absalom Tatom, the Lodge journeyed to Chapel Hill to help lay the cornerstone of Old East (see below). Mr. Brown said, among many other interesting things, that the long sought drawings made 1823 by State Architect William Nichols for Masonic Hall were defiantly not now in the building. He also said that, contrary to public belief, there was nothing secret about the Masonic Order or its Hall which was thrown open to the Society and its guests for a coffee hour after the program.

 

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MORE CRAFTSMEN FROM THE HILLSBOROUGH AREA

Date                Name                           Craft                Apprentice

Feb. 1778        John Moore                Miller              Jane MaCaleb, 4 years

Feb. 1778        William Wood             Joiner              James MaCaleb

Nov. 1779       David Slaon                 Taylor             Solomon Terrell, Orphan, 11 years

Feb. 1780        Isaac Burklow             Carpenter        John Brannon, 7 years

Nov. 1780       John Coontz               Carpenter        Thomas Airls (2 years old till 21)

Nov. 1780       George Sharp              ?                      John Battrell

Aug. 1781       William Anderson       Taylor             John Love, 10 ½ years

Feb. 1782        Benjamin Chapman     Stocking          William Edwards, 15

Weaver            years, till 21

Aug. 1783       Elizabeth Sharp           Spinner and     Catey Reaves (orphan girl

Weaver            4 years old; bound until 18)

Mar. 1785       William Parks              Shoemaker       Martin Murphy aged 2 years

Mar. 1785       Matthew MaCauley   Blacksmith      Thomas Kee (orphan, 10 yrs.)

Nov. 1785       Jannett Anderson        Taylor             John Reeves (orphan, 13 yrs, until 21)

Aug. 1786       William Holliday         Blacksmith      Benjamin Nicholson (orphan, 12 years, until                                                                                     21)

Nov. 1786       John Galbreath            Taylor             Richard Clifton (ages 16 ½ years, until 21)

Feb. 1788        Brien Collingwood      Taylor             John Dishon (aged 5 years, until 21)

———-

Note: List to be continued. We are particularly interested in finding the names of joiners (cabinet-makers), potters (if any), and brick-masons. Old Salem had potters; but Hillsborough apparently had none.

 

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EARLY LINKS BETWEEN HILLSBOROUGH AND SALEM –

Both Hillsborough and Old Salem are marking 200th anniversaries this year. Hillsborough, the 200th anniversary of its name Hillsborough, and Old Salem the 200th anniversary of its founding on its present site in Salem. Then, as now, there was a good deal of friendly intercourse between the two communities in spite of the long miles of hills and forests separating them.

Hillsborough merchants ordered tinware, paper, and leather goods from the Moravian craftsmen who sent it down at intervals on their wagons. The valuable Letter-Book of John Hogg & Co. (owned by Mr. James Webb Cheshire and kindly loaned last year to the Society) tells of the commerce between the canny Scots merchants of Hillsborough and the equally canny Moravians of Salem.

Letter 19 (July 10, 1799) from John Hogg to Gottlieb Shober, Esq., Salem, says that the paper ordered for Messrs. Boylan and Polk (in Raleigh) and the tinware for John Hogg & Co. has been received but that there is a mistake. There are “41 Rheams instead if 49 Rheams of trimmed writing paper for Mr. Polk” and “only 1 instead of 2 Rheams of wrapping paper charged us.” Further, continues Mr. Hogg, “Your Tinner and myself hold very different ideas as to the Tin Canisters. I conceive the price charged as fully their value if not above it.”

Letter 21 (July 24, 1799) from John Hogg to Gottlieb Shober, Esq., Salem, says they will “adjust the Rheam dispute” as soon as Hogg can see his “waggoner”. In the meantime he inquires about a “young Sorrel horse”, also about “wagon-harness, blind Bridges, Collars, Breechbands”, and “the price of Waggons, complete for the Road.”

Letter 31 (Sept. 15, 1799) from John Hogg to Gottlieb Shober, Esq., Salem, Carries a handsome retraction from Hogg about the “Rheams.” Says he, “On loading the wagon for Raleigh which took down the paper for Messrs. Hodge and Boylan & Col. Polk, the paper for the latter turned out only 40 Rheams so that we are obliged to admit that your Millman had been correct a/c not withstanding what we had heretofore alleged (sic).” Hogg then orders some “good Leather Collars and Blind Bridles” from Herr Shober.

Another point of contact between the two early towns is revealed in the late Dr. Adelaide Fries’ translation of the Salem Diary (1804). Three little Hillsborough girls were the first “outside” pupils to attend the new Boarding School for Girls in Salem:

May 14, Temporary arrangements have been completed for the Boarding School for Girls in Salem… Yesterday the first three outside pupils arrived, Elizabeth Strudwick, Ann and Elizabeth Kirkland, eight and ten years old, brought from Hillsborough by the father of the latter, Mr. William Kirkland. These three children and two little town girls, Paulina Shober and Maria Steiner, were formally accepted for the Boarding School, and so the beginning was made with hearty prayer to the Savior for His Grace and blessing.

May 18, Mr. Duncan Cameron from Hillsborough brought a nine-year old girl, Mary Phillips, to the Boarding School.”

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22 YEAR OLD ADDRESS DISCOVERED – The Reverend William Mercer Green’s (1798-1889) formal address, delivered 122 years ago on Sept. 7, 1844, at the laying of the cornerstone of the Old Courthouse, came to light a few weeks ago at the Masonic Hall. The 20-page speech, written in the Reverend Green’s neat handwriting and interlaced with his corrections, is sewed together with waxed thread. All sheets except the outer ones are in fair condition.

Reverend Green was the first rector of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church from 1825-1837 and later the first Bishop of Mississippi. His 1844 address, delivered from the opened south doors of the old frame courthouse in the northeast corner of Courthouse Square (Lot 1) diplomatically by-passed “the diversity of opinion” that had existed about placing the building in Hillsborough and concentrated on the concept of justice in American government and on “the hallowed ground” on which the new building was to rise.

Reverend Green, himself a member of Eagle Lodge, had presented the manuscript of his address to his Masonic brethren for their archives.

———

“THE DARK WALK” (a reprint of an article written by Mrs. George Gilmore for her “Garden Gossip” column some years ago):

“Last week space did not permit me to mention the lovely and historic “Dark Walk”, but no spot along the banks of the Eno River has played a more important part in the life of his community.

“Before the invention of automobiles or movies “Dark Walk” was the favorite rendezvous for the young and old of Hillsborough. On Sunday afternoons families went down to enjoy the cool shade and pleasant company of their friends. Parents chatted in groups while children played in the shallows of the River or gathered wild flowers along the path. Then initials of people long gone may be seen still, carved on the trunks of the trees.

“An old lady who has been dead for twenty years told me that her husband proposed to her on her sixteenth birthday down in “Dark Walk”. She said each year a family of wild ducks nested in a hole in a tree near the present river bridge and it was a great event, which the entire town turned out to see, when the proud parents brought their new ducklings out for their first swim.

“If you have never been in “Dark Walk” you have missed a rare treat. The trees arch over the Walk like a vaulted cathedral. Hundreds of feet for many, many years packed the earth into a firm floor. The song of birds is all about you with the accompaniment of the River. The Walk is cool and shady with the musty smell of fallen leaves, and I know that it is peopled with the ghosts of the past who once enjoyed Sunday afternoons “Down by the Riverside.”

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ABSTRACTS OF ORANGE COURT MINUTES – Two Society members have recently completed the monumental job of abstracting the old hand-written Orange County Court Minutes, and scores of researchers will doubtless be grateful to them forevermore. Mrs. Ruth Herndon Shields, 227 Vance St., Chapel Hill, N.C. is publishing Abstracts of the Minutes… from 1752-1766, that is, for the first fourteen years of the County Courts of Orange in the colonial period; and Mrs. Alma Cheek Redden, P.O. Box 851, Hillsborough, N.C., has already published Abstracts of the Minutes… from 1777-1788. These are the Minutes of the County Courts for the first eleven years of the life of Orange County in the new State of North Carolina. (Orange County court Minutes are missing from 1766 to 1777.)

The two volumes record masses of invaluable information: the names of Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, Constables, road overseers, county surveyors, road commissioners, jurors, administrators of estates, guardians of orphans, masters of crafts and their orphan apprentices, records of ordinary and tavern licenses, also licenses for ferries and grist mills, etc., orders for the building of roads and bridges, deeds and wills registered and recorder with executor often named, etc., etc.

Each book is $7.50 per copy (multigraphed and soft-bound) and may be ordered directly from each author.

SHAPE OF THE COLONIAL RACE-PATH – A recent national news-story declared the old Crab Orchard race track near Louisville, Kentucky, to be the first oval race track in America. It’s date was 1778, and the historic site is nothing but pastureland now.

A look at the Southier Map of Hillsborough shows that our Colonial Race-Path (before 1768) was oval save for one flat end. The Race-Path was laid out in a north-west to south-east direction, and the flat end was toward the north-west.

It was the British custom to race clockwise on the grass, and it is likely that horses did race clockwise on the Hillsborough track. (Racing was extremely popular here, and Francis Nash, especially, was known for some fine horses presented to him by his father-in-law, Maurice Moore.) The British style was reversed at the Crab Orchard track where horses ran counterclockwise on clay, now the accepted American pattern for racing.

HILLSBOROUGH AND OLD EAST, UNC’S NATIONAL LANDMARK – UNC’S Old East Building, the nation’s oldest state university building (1793) was officially cited in December by Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udal as a National Historic Landmark. Like so many early buildings, events, and figures at Chapel Hill, Old East, “that ancient wonder” as the Daily Tar Heel called it, had various ties with Historic Hillsborough.

James Patterson, its undertaker (i.e., builder), was a brick mason who appears to have lived in Hillsborough before moving to Chapel Hill and Chatham County. His price for building Old East was $5000 (the building is constructed of hand-made bricks), and he had to remind the University at least once that it owed him for his work. William R. Davie, a leading Trustee, said he thought Patterson charged “six or seven times” too much.

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Originally, Old East had only two floors. It has six chimneys since open fireplaces were the only source of heat for early Carolina gentlemen who had to supply their own firewood. The original roof of the building was of oaken shingles (now it is tin). A 1797 sketch of the building by a student John Pettigrew has fortunately been preserved. Not only was Old East the earliest University building but it was the only University building until Person Hall was built in 1797. Now it is a men’s dormitory.

Roswell Huntington (1763-1836) of Hillsborough, the Connecticut silversmith and engraver who trained a whole family of silversmiths, engraved the bronze plate for Old East’s cornerstone which was laid on Oct. 12, 1793, by “the Brethren of the Eagle Lodge of Hillsborough” together with other officials. This is the inscription of one side of the plate which was stolen during the Civil War and lost from view for 50 years before miraculously reappearing in a junk dealer’s shop in Clarksville, Va., in 1916:

Hunc Lapidem

Honorariis Curatoribus hujus Academiae

Nec non

Fratribus Masonicis Hillsboris aliundeque

Rite presentibus

Gulielmus R. Davie, equestris praefectus

Carolinaque Septentrionalis Arche Architicus

Anno Lucis 5793o      Salutis 1793o

Americanae Libretatis 18

& 12 mo die Octabris

Mul Cum Ordine

Locarit

Sit Aere Perennius

 

THIS STONE

IN THE PRESENCE OF THE HONORARY TRUSTEES OF THIS ACADEMY

AND ALSO

OF THE MASONIC BROTHERS FROM HILLSBOROUGH AND ELSEWHERE

WITH DUE AND PROPER RITE

WILLIAM R. DAVIE,           COMMANDER OF THE KNIGHTS

OF NORTH CAROLINA     MASTER-MASON

IN THE YEAR OF LIGHT 5793      OF SALVATION 1793

OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE 18

AND ON THE 12TH DAY OF OCTOBER

WITH PRECISE ALIGNMENT

PLACED

MAY IT BE MORE LASTING THAN BRONZE

            A similar but slightly different inscription in English is on the reverse side. Huntington’s engraved plate was properly relaid at University Day ceremonies on October 12, 1916, 123 years after its original placement by “the Masonic brothers from Hillsborough and elsewhere”.

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NEW COLOR SLIDES – Keller Color, Inc., of Clifton, N.Y., on May 16 made a number of color slides for prospective sale at the Orange County Historical Museum – several views of the interior of the Museum, exteriors and a few interiors of various historic houses, the Regulator marker, and various public buildings. After the final selection is made, the Museum will offer 12 or 15 of the color slides for sale.

SPECIAL WILLIAM HOOPER EXHIBIT AT THE MUSEUM – The Orange County Historical Museum will offer a special William Hooper Exhibit for two weeks in July beginning July 3. Items to be shown will include pictures, letters, signatures, newspaper clippings, bookplates and books as well as a music box and table-swift. One of William Hooper’s own school texts (Six Comedies of Terence) used at Harvard College in 1760 will be on exhibit. The book carries William Hooper’s autograph and that of Peter Faneuil of Boston.

The Museum has had specially framed for the Exhibit a print of James Reid Lambdin’s portrait of William Hooper (painted in 1873) and also a print of John Trumbull’s famous painting (ca. 1789-90) of “The Declaration of Independence”.

NEWS NOTES: Coming soon: ribbon-cutting ceremonies at Central Carolina Bank and Trust’s handsomely renovated building on Churton Street and a June fashion show of old costumes at the Orange County Historical Museum… Orange County will lose one of its oldest houses before long – the old Johnston homeplace midway between Hillsborough and Chapel Hill… More attractive improvements in downtown Hillsborough: the “green” plantings at the Phillips 66 service station opposite the Presbyterian Church – box, azaleas, periwinkle, and cotoneaster: the black-green paddling fences concealing an alley-way; the eight new boxwood at the Cadwallader Jones Law Office (a Society project); and the increasing number of large flowered clematis everywhere… Moorefields now has a new entrance drive a few yards east of the former one. The new drive will bring the visitor past a reflecting pond… Mrs. Charles H. Blake, Horticulture Committee Chairman, had an article on the many activities of the Society’s Horticulture Committee in a recent issue of the N.C. Gardener… The Raleigh News and Observer still spells Hillsborough’s name incorrectly… At last: the big Sunday Travel ads prepared by the American Petroleum Company have included Hillsborough… Almost every day now: old-fashioned hand-turned freezer ice cream at the Colonial Inn.

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Picture of The Old Town Pump on Churton Street (ea. 1914). The well is now covered by paving.

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Picture – William Hooper’s Gravestone – (slab in center) in the Old Town Cemetery. Placed by his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Hooper Watters, some years after his death in 1790.

Picture – The Sandstone Slab over William Hooper’s grave. The deeply cut words, “Signer of the Declaration of Independence”, were added when the slab was taken to Greensboro in 1894.

Picture – William Hooper’s Dearest Friends, James and McDowell Alvis Hogg, are buried here (in the foreground) only a few feet from the Signer.

Picture – Wall Near William Hooper’s grave restored by the Hillsborough Historical Society.

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Picture – No description

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Picture – Cadwallader Jones’ Law Office (ca. 1839 or slightly earlier) New boxwood has recently been planted here.

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